The Archaeological Conservancy's

Virtual Tour Video Series

Episode 2: Pueblo San Marcos

Join The Archaeological Conservancy’s President, Mark Michel, on a Virtual Tour of Pueblo San Marcos – an Archaeological Conservancy preserve located near the Cerrillos Hills of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

In Episode 2, you’ll learn more about the people, technologies, and trade of San Marcos; the role of Pueblo San Marcos in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680; the research conducted there over the past 100 years; and how the site came to be one of the Conservancy’s first acquisitions in the 1980’s.

If you want to learn even more about Pueblo San Marcos, keep scrolling after the video to view the photo gallery and links for further reading.

Photos

Aerial Photo of Pueblo San Marcos with the Cerrillos Hills in the background captured during the filming of the Virtual Tour.  | Photo by Alexander Rose (2020)
Line drawing recreation of San Marcos located in the offices of The Archaeological Conservancy in Albuquerque, NM. | Photo Courtesy of The Archaeological Conservancy.
Site map created during excavations from 1998 to 2001 by Dr. Dave Thomas.  | Courtesy of American Museum of Natural History
Volunteers and Conservancy staff performing stabilization work on San Marcos Arroyo in the 1980's.  | Photo courtesy of The Archaeological Conservancy.
Volunteers and Conservancy staff performing stabilization work on San Marcos Arroyo in the 1980's.  | Photo courtesy of The Archaeological Conservancy.
Southwest Regional Director and Vice President, James Walker (standing on the hillside in the far left of the photo) giving a tour of San Marcos to local homeowners in the 1980's. | Photo courtesy of The Archaeological Conservancy.
Dr. Curtis Brennen performing salvage work on a room block that was undercut by flood waters from the San Marcos Arroyo in the 1980's. Pueblo San Marcos was constructed of poured adobe walls, which can be seen in this exposed room block. | Photo courtesy of The Archaeological Conservancy.
Volunteer archaeologist, Karen Gorge, performing salvage work on a room block at Pueblo San Marcos in the 1980's.  | Photo courtesy of The Archaeological Conservancy.
A lead glaze vessel discovered at Pueblo San Marcos during salvage work in the 1980's. This pottery style is characteristic of San Marcos and is achieved using lead ore mined from the Cerrillos Hills.  | Photo courtesy of The Archaeological Conservancy.
Pueblo San Marcos was excavated by Nels Christian Nelson twice in the early 1900's.  This is a map created during his 1915 excavations. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
Nels C. Nelson, a Danish-American Archaeologist who conducted research at San Marcos in the early 1900's. 
Map of the mission and convento area that was excavated by Dr. Dave Thomas from 1998 to 2001 under the auspices of The American Museum of Natural History. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
Dr. David Thomas (top right) and crew excavating the mission at San Marcos in the early 2000's. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
Some of the crew during the excavations of the mission at San Marcos in the early 2000's. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
Crew members screening excavated soil at San Marcos during the early 2000's. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
Crew members mapping San Marcos during research in the early 2000's. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
Baptismal font discovered inside the mission during excavations. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
The church entrance exposed during excavation. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
A view of the excavated convento area. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.
A decoration revealed inside of the convento during excavations. | Photo courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History.

Further Reading and Links

Go deeper and learn even more about Pueblo San Marcos by visiting the following links:

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