Skip to main content
Author Publisher Copyright Date Media Type Review Date Volume Number
Frederick H. Hanselmann



University Press of Florida 2019 Book Winter 2019-20 Vol. 23 No. 4

In 2007, a shipwreck was discovered just off the coast of Catalina Island in the Dominican Republic. Fortunately, it was reported to the authorities who promptly asked a team of marine archaeologists to investigate. After a quick survey, the team proposed that the wreck, which had numerous cannons, was from the mid-seventeenth to early eighteenth centuries. This matched the time period and last known location of the Quedagh Merchant, a ship abandoned by Captain William Kidd in 1699, while he returned to Boston to answer charges that he was a pirate. The ship was believed to have been burned at about that time by Kidd’s Dominican colleagues. Kidd fared no better, as he was determined to be a pirate, sent to London, tried, and hanged. Stories of buried treasure abounded, and the wreck of the Quedagh Merchant was much sought after but never found. Until 2007.

This engaging volume tells the story of professional marine archaeologists from Indiana University who mapped and studied the wreck using the latest techniques and technology. They also made extensive use of historical documents, largely from Kidd’s trial, to match the wreck to descriptions of the ship and its contents. The historical documentation and the features of the wreck were determined to closely match the Quedagh Merchant, making a very high probability that this is the ship. Kidd left no treasure behind on the ship, taking it with him to New England, thus making the wreck an unlikely target to treasure hunters who destroy many shipwrecks. The next challenge was how best to manage and preserve the wreck.

Located in thirty feet of water near the shore, the wreck of the Quedagh Merchant was an excellent candidate for preservation in place and the subsequent development of an underwater museum accessible to the general public. The Dominican Republic is actively promoting tourism, and this wreck was an opportunity to further that development, while also preserving an important historical site. The author carefully explains the legal and practical challenges in developing this living museum. This then becomes a blueprint for turning a major historical wreck into a marine protected area for the general public and the preservation and educational programs that goes with it. In 2011, the Captain Kidd Living Museum in the Sea was dedicated. Secondary exhibits also opened in London where Kidd was hanged and in Indianapolis.

Captain Kidd’s Lost Ship covers both the theoretical issues of marine archaeology as well as its practical application. It is also a fantastic case study of the identification, investigation, and permanent preservation a wonderful piece of history.

Find Another Book Review

Title Author Excerpt Publisher Copyright Date Media Type Review Date Volume Number
Explanations in Iconography: Ancient American Indian Art, Symbol, and Meaning Carol Diaz-Granados



Iconography is the study of symbols and their interpretation. In American archaeology, it is a growing field of interest that is providing new insights into ancient cultural beliefs. In this... Oxbow Books 2023 Book Spring 2024 28 1
Birds and Beasts of Ancient Mesoamerica Susan Milbrath
Elizabeth Baquedano


Animals played a central role in the lives of ancient Mesoamericans. They were watched for signs of seasonal changes which carried portents of the future. They were pathways for communicating... University Press of Colorado 2022 Book or ebook Spring 2024 28 1
Jamestown Archaeology: Remains to be Seen William M. Kelso



In 1994 on the banks of the James River near the remains of Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in the Americas, archaeologists with the Jamestown Rediscovery Project under the... Routledge 2024 Book Spring 2024 28 1
Sins of the Shovel: Looting, Murder & the Evolution of American Archaeology Rachel Morgan



In 1888, Colorado cowboys Richard Wetherill and his brother-in-law Charlie Mason rode into the canyons of Mesa Verde looking for stray cattle. What they found changed the course of American... University of Chicago Press 2023 Book Spring 2024 Vol 28 1
Climate Chaos: Lessons on Survival from Our Ancestors Brian Fagan
Nadia Durrani


As the world struggles to cope with human-caused climate change that threatens modern society, Climate Chaos surveys climate disruptions over the past 30,000 years and how they affected ancient cultures.... Public Affairs 2021 Book or ebook Spring 2022 Vol 26 No. 1
The Indigenous Paleolithic of the Western Hemisphere Paulette F.C. Steeves



This volume examines in depth the peopling of the Western Hemisphere from an Indigenous point of view. The author, Paulette F.C. Steeves, is Cree and Metis. She grew up in... University of Nebraska Press 2021 Book Spring 2022 Vol 26 No. 1
The Calf Creek Horizon: A Mid-Holocene Hunter-Gatherer Adaption in the Central and Southern Plains of North America Jon C. Lohse
Marjorie A. Duncan
Don G. Wyckoff

Six thousand years ago, a distinctive culture emerged in the Southern Plains of North America covering Oklahoma, most of Texas and Kansas, and parts of Arkansas, Missouri, New Mexico, Colorado,... Texas A&M University Press 2021 Book Spring 2022 Vol 26 No. 1
Indigenous Continent: The Epic Contest for North America Pukka Hämäläinen



Pekka Hämäläinen, a professor of American history at Oxford University, seeks to write, or rather rewrite, the history of America north of Mexico. In the beginning he rejects the conventional... Live right Publishing 2022 Book Spring 2023 Vol. 27 No. 1
Buried Beneath the City: An Archaeological History of New York Nan A. Rothschild
Amanda Sutphin
H. Arthur Bankoff,
Jessica Striebel MacLean
This fascinating story of archaeology in America’s biggest city is a case study in how modern techniques can produce voluminous new information under sometimes very difficult conditions. For the past... Columbia University Press 2022 Book Spring 2023 Vol. 27 No. 1
Scientific Dating in Archeology Seren Griffiths



The dating of archaeological artifacts and sites is one of the most important aspects of the field, and one of the most difficult. Fortunately, thanks to scientific advances in a... Oxbow Books 2022 Book Spring 2023 Vol. 27 No. 1
A Green Band in a Parched and Burning Land: Subaipuri O’odham Landscapes Deni J. Seymour



The Subaipuri O’odham were farmers who lived along the rivers of southeastern Arizona before and during the time of Spanish contact in the 16th century to the present. They were... University Press of Colorado 2022 Book Spring 2023 Vol. 27 No. 1
Native American Archaeology in the Parks Kenneth L. Feder



Many important and spectacular archaeological sites are permanently preserved on public lands administered by the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S.... Rowman & Littlefield 2023 Book Summer 2023 Vol. 27 No. 2
Gods of Thunder: How Climate Change, Travel, and Spirituality Reshaped Precolonial America Timothy R. Pauketat



This engaging study surveys the impact of the Medieval Climatic Anomaly of A.D. 800-1300 in North and Central America. The Medieval Climatic Anomaly was a worldwide phenomenon that is best... Oxford University Press 2023 Book Summer 2023 Vol. 27 No. 2
Clotilda: The History and Archaeology of the Last Slave Ship James P. Delgado
Deborah E. Marx
Kyle Lentt
Joseph Grinnan
Alexander DeCaro
In the summer of 1860, the schooner Clotilda arrived in Mobile Bay with a cargo of more than 100 enslaved people brought illegally from present day Benin in west Africa.... University of Alabama Press 2023 Book Summer 2023 Vol. 27 No. 2
Large-Scale Traps of the Great Basin Bryan Hockett
Eric Dillingham


Early hunter gatherers developed all kinds of devices to assist them in hunting large game animals. One of their innovations was large-scale traps made of rocks and wood that allowed... Texas A&M University Press 2023 Book Summer 2023 Vol. 27 No. 2
Pushing Boundaries in Southwestern Archaeology: Chronology, Collections, and Contexts Stephen E. Nash
Erin L. Baxter


This volume presents the proceedings from the 16th Southwest Seminar of 2018, a biennial conference that focuses on the latest developments in Southwestern archaeology. It consists of 20 chapters that... University Press of Colorado 2023 Book Fall 2023 Vol. 27 No. 3
Vapaki: Ancestral O’Odham Platform Mounds of the Sonoran Desert Glen E. Rice
Arley W. Simon
Chris Loendorf

Between about A.D. 1075 and 1450, the Hohokam of southern Arizona built lots of platform mounds, mainly along the Gila and Salt Rivers where they practiced extensive irrigation agriculture. Much... University of Utah Press 2023 Book Fall 2023 Vol. 27 No. 3
In the Shadow of the Steamboat: A Natural and Cultural History of North Warner Valley, Oregon Geoffrey M. Smith



The Warner Valley lies in the northwestern Great Basin where Nevada, California, and Oregon meet. Some 17,000 years ago, near the end of the Pleistocene, the valley was covered by... University of Utah Press 2023 Book Fall 2023 Vol. 27 No. 3
Studying the Princess Carolina: Anatomy of the Ship That Held Up Wall Street Warren C. Riess



In 1982, archaeologists conducting a pre-construction excavation in lower Manhattan’s financial district discovered the remains of an 18th century sailing ship. They called in nautical archaeologists including Warren Riess of... Texas A&M University Press 2023 Book Fall 2023 Vol. 27 No. 3
Blurred Boundaries: Perspectives on Rock Art of the Greater Southwest William Frej
Polly Schaafsma


Ancient enigmatic images can be found on rocks throughout the desert Southwest—from the Four Corners to Baja, California. They number in the tens of thousands and span many thousands of... Museum of New Mexico Press 2023 Book Winter 2023-24 Vol. 27 No. 4
Holes in Our Moccasins, Holes in Our Stories: Apachean Origins and the Promontory, Franktown, and Dismal River Archaeological Records John W. Ives
Joel C. Janetski


On the northern and eastern shores of the Great Salt Lake in Utah, there are a dozen or so dry caves that were inhabited by ancient Indigenous people. From 1930... University of Utah Press 2022 Book Winter 2023-24 Vol. 27 No. 4
Fluted Points of the Far West Michael F. Rondeau



The California Fluted Lanceolate Uniform Testing and Evaluation Database (CalFLUTED) project commenced in 2003 to bring together all the data on fluted projectile (spear) points in four states (California, Nevada,... University of Utah Press 2023 Book Winter 2023-24 Vol. 27 No. 4
Spiro Mounds and WPA Archaeology in Oklahoma Scott W. Hammerstedt
Amanda L. Regnier


Spiro is a large group of mounds in eastern Oklahoma that is part of the Mississippian tradition of the American Midwest and Southeast. It appears to have been occupied by... Arcadia Publishing 2023 Book Winter 2023-24 Vol. 27 No. 4
A History of Platform Mound Ceremonialism: Finding Meaning in Elevated Ground Megan C. Kassabaum



For more than 8,000 years, Native Americans have been building earthen mounds in what is now the Eastern United States. The mounds come in all sizes, from minute to massive,... University of Florida Press 2021 Book Fall 2021 Vol. 25 No. 3
Unearthing St. Mary’s City: Fifty Years of Archaeology at Maryland’s First Capital Henry M. Miller
Travis G. Parno


English colonists founded St. Mary’s City in 1634, and it was one of the first English settlements in the Americas. Inspired by George Calvert, Lord Baltimore, St. Mary’s City was... University Press of Florida 2021 Book Fall 2021 Vol. 25 No. 3
Hunters of the Mid-Holocene Forest: Old Cordilleran Culture Sites at Granite Falls, Washington James C. Chatters
Jason B. Cooper
Philippe D. LeTourneau

The Old Cordilleran Tradition of the Pacific Northwest consists of a distinctive stone tool assemblage of projectile points, knives, and other items. It is found from central British Columbia to... University of Utah Press 2021 Book Fall 2021 Vol. 25 No. 3
Reconsidering Mississippian Communities and Households Elizabeth Watts Malouchos
Aileen Betzenhauser


This volume updates the seminal Mississippian Communities and Households, edited by J. Daniel Rogers and Bruce D. Smith and published in 1995. That study advanced southeastern archaeology bringing the study... University of Alabama Press 2021 Book Winter 2021-22 Vol. 25 No. 4
The Greater Chaco Landscape: Ancestors, Scholarship, and Advocacy Ruth M. Van Dyke
Carrie C. Heitman


The Chaco Culture consists of Chaco Canyon with its dozen or so magnificent Great Houses plus more than 200 outlying sites in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico, Colorado,... University Press of Colorado 2021 Book Winter 2021-22 Vol. 25 No. 4
Unburied Lives: The Historical Archaeology of Buffalo Soldiers at Fort Davis, Texas, 1869-1875 Laurie A. Wilkie



When the Civil War ended in 1865, many Black Union soldiers chose to remain in the army, whose two main missions were to pacify and reconstruct the South and to... University of New Mexico Press 2021 Book Winter 2021-22 Vol. 25 No. 4
Kudzu on the Ivory Tower: From the Backwoods to an Academic Career in the Deep, Deep South Evan Peacock



In his Forward, archaeologist Ian Brown introduces this autobiography thus, “What you are about to read is another version of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, with Evan Peacock serving as…Huck.”... Borgo Publishing 2021 Winter 2021-22 Vol. 25 No. 4
Diversity in Open-Air Site Structure Across the Pleistocene/Holocene Boundary Kristen A. Carlson
Leland C. Bement


The late Pleistocene/early Holocene period (ca. 12,500 years ago) was a time of retreating glaciers and expanding human activity. Many large mammals were declining, perhaps in part due to over... University Press of Colorado 2022 Book Fall 2022 Vol 26 No. 3
Girl Archaeologist: Sisterhood in a Sexist Profession Alice Beck Kehoe



Eighty-six year old Alice Beck Kehoe tells the saga of a female archaeologist who began a calling in a field with few women and lots of sexism, and who persisted... University of Nebraska Press 2022 Book Fall 2022 Vol 26 No. 3
Linda S. Cordell: Innovating Southwest Archaeology Maxine E. McBrinn
Deborah L. Huntley


Linda Cordell (1943-2013) was a pioneering researcher of the American Southwest who helped shape the modern archaeology of the region, particularly in the upper Rio Grande. A native of New... Museum of New Mexico Press 2022 Book Fall 2022 Vol 26 No. 3
The Archaeology of Place & Space in the West Emily Dale
Carolyn L. White


This volume uses landscape to examine space (a geographic location) and place (the lived experience of a locale) in the American West. The history of the West is bound up... University of Utah Press 2022 Book Fall 2022 Vol 26 No. 3
Real, Recent, or Replica: Pre-Columbian Caribbean Heritage as Art, Commodity, and Inspiration Joanna Ostapokowicz
Jonathan A. Hanna


This study documents the growing demand for pre-Columbian art and artifacts in the Caribbean Islands, be they real, recent, or replica. Archaeologists of the region are under increasing pressure to... University of Alabama Press 2022 Book Winter 2022-23 Vol 26 No. 4
The American Southeast at the End of the Ice Age D. Shane Miller
Ashley M. Smallwood
Jesse W. Tune

This book is a synthesis of recent and current research of the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene period (ca. 13,400-9000 B.P.) in the American Southeast, with contributions from expert researchers.... University of Alabama Press 2022 Book Winter 2022-23 Vol 26 No. 4
Living and Dying on the Periphery Jamie L. Clark
John D. Speth


This volume uses landscape to examine space (a geographic location) and place (the lived experience of a locale) in the American West. The history of the West is bound up... University of Utah Press 2022 Book Winter 2022-23 Vol 26 No. 4
On Desert Shores: Archaeology and History of the Western Midriff Isalnds in the Gulf of California Thomas Bowen



The Midriff Islands are located in the Gulf of California. They are hot, dry, and currently uninhabited. But for thousands of years they were home to Native Americans—the Seri people... University of Utah Press 2022 Book Winter 2022-23 Vol 26 No. 4
The Story of Food in the Human Past: How What We Ate Made Us Who We Are Robyn E. Cutright



This fascinating study surveys the role of food over the past four million years of human prehistory. The author, Robyn Cutright, an anthropologist at Centre College, develops three major themes... University of Alabama Press 2021 Book Summer 2022 Vol 26 No. 2
Origin: A Genetic History of the Americas Jennifer Raff



Forty years ago, most archaeologists were pretty sure they had discovered how the Americas were colonized. Around 13,200 years ago, native Siberians crossed the then-dry Bering Sea to Alaska. (Sea... Hachette Book Group 2022 Book Summer 2022 Vol 26 No. 2
The Architecture of Hunting: The Built Environment of Hunter Gatherers Ashley Lemke



This groundbreaking study focuses on the architecture—including blinds, drive lanes, animal corrals, and fishing weirs—hunter gatherers used to increase their success beginning at the end of the last Ice Age,... Texas A&M University Press 2022 Book Summer 2022 Vol 26 No. 2
People in a Sea of Grass: Archaeology’s Changing Perspective on Indigenous Plains Communities Matthew E. Hill, Jr.
Lauren W. Ritterbush


This volume surveys recent developments in the archaeology of the Central Plains covering cultural traditions of the Woodland-era Kansas City Hopewell, late prehistoric Plains traditions, and ancestral and early historic... University of Utah Press 2022 Book Summer 2022 Vol 26 No. 2
Native Intoxicants of North America Sean Rafferty



An intoxicant is a mind-altering substance that is mainly derived from plants, and it is toxic. A nearly universal human trait is the use of intoxicants to experience altered states... University of Tennessee Press 2021 Book or ebook Spring 2022 Vol 26 No. 1
Authority, Autonomy, and the Archaeology of a Mississippian Community Erin S. Nelson



Mississippi’s northern Yazoo Basin is densely populated with Mississippian-period mound sites. Located along abandoned channels of the Mississippi River, these sites fit a general pattern of one or more platform... University of Florida Press 2019 Book Summer 2020 Vol. 24 No. 2
Conquistador’s Wake: Tracking the Legacy of Hernando de Soto in the Indigenous Southeast Dennis B. Blanton



In 1539, Hernando de Soto and his army of some 600 men landed in Florida. Fresh from the successful conquest of the fabulously wealthy Inca in Peru, Soto had high... University of Georgia Press 2020 Book Summer 2020 Vol. 24 No. 2
Early Farming and Warfare in Northwest Mexico Robert J. Hard and John R. Roney



In northern Chihuahua and Sonora and southern Arizona, there are many hills covered with dozens of elaborate terraces known as trincheras. Over the years, archaeologists have wondered why they were... University of Utah Press 2020 Book Summer 2020 Vol. 24 No. 2
Megadrought in the Carolinas: The Archaeology of Mississippian Collapse, Abandonment, and Coalescence John S. Cable



Between about A.D. 1200 and 1500 large areas of the Americas, along with their sophisticated cultures, were abandoned. These include the Four Corners region in the Southwest, the Hohokam area... University of Alabama Press 2020 Book Fall 2020 Vol. 24 No. 3
Lost Maya Cities: Archaeological Quests in the Mexican Jungle Ivan Sprajc



Between 1996 and 2014, Slovenian archaeologist Ivan Sprajc led a project to explore a large part of southern Campeche state for INAH, the National Institute for Archaeology and History, which... Texas A&M University Press 2020 Book Fall 2020 Vol. 24 No. 3
Teotihuacan: The World Beyond the City Kenneth G. Hirt
David M. Carballo
Barbara Arroyo

Between about 100 B.C. and A.D. 550 a great Native American city developed, flourished, and declined near modern Mexico City. With a peak population of as many as 125,000 residents,... Dumbarton Oaks 2020 Book Fall 2020 Vol. 24 No. 3
Six Hundred Generations: An Archaeological History of Montana Carl M. Davis



This volume covers the human presence in Montana from its beginnings some 15,000 years ago to the establishment of Indian reservations in the 1880s by looking at twelve important archaeological... Riverbend Publishing 2019 Book Fall 2020 Vol. 24 No. 3
Ancient Southwestern Mortuary Practices James T. Watson
Gordon F.M. Rakita


This is a report on a multi-year research project carried out by a number of archaeologists that aims to create a regional synthesis of prehistoric mortuary practices across the American... University Press of Colorado 2020 Book WInter 2020-21 Vol. 24 No. 4
Indigenous Life Around the Great Lakes: War, Climate, and Culture Richard W. Edwards IV



This study offers a detailed look at the Native cultures of northeastern Illinois and southeastern Wisconsin between A.D. 1000 and 1400, who are generally known as the Oneota. The beginning... University of Notre Dame Press 2020 Book WInter 2020-21 Vol. 24 No. 4
Color in the Ancestral Pueblo Southwest Marit K. Munson
Kelley Hays-Gilpin


This ground-breaking volume, spotlights the use and importance of color over some 2,000 years of Ancestral Puebloan history. Perhaps because we take it for granted in our modern world, we... University of Utah Press 2020 WInter 2020-21 Vol. 24 No. 4
Waterlogged: Examples and Procedures for Northwest Coast Archaeologists Kathryn Bernick



The ancient people of the Northwest Coast made an estimated eighty-five percent of their objects from wood or other plant materials that normally deteriorate rather quickly, leaving archaeologists with little... Washington State University Press 2020 Book WInter 2020-21 Vol. 24 No. 4
Using and Curating Archaeological Collections S. Terry Childs
Mark S. Warner


Preserving and curating archaeological collections is one of the most important aspects of the discipline. Too often curation is treated as second fiddle to field work and analysis. Yet millions... The SAA Press 2020 Book Spring 2021 Vol. 25 No. 1
The House of the Cylinder Jars: Room 28 in Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon Patricia L. Crown



In August 1896, members of the Hyde Exploring Expedition began excavating a room (numbered 28) in the northern part of Pueblo Bonito, the largest and fanciest great house in New... University of New Mexico Press 2020 Book Spring 2021 Vol. 25 No. 1
Maya Ruins revisited: In the Footsteps of Teobert Maler William Frej



This stunning, large format book is a collection of black and white photographs of Maya ruins in the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico and Guatemala. The photographers are William Frej and... Peyton Wright Gallery Press 2020 Book Spring 2021 Vol. 25 No. 1
Salt in Eastern North America and the Caribbean Ashley A. Dumas
Paul N. Eubanks


Salt is essential to human health, especially in hot, humid climates like Eastern North America. As such it was an important commodity to Native Americans from the earliest settlement of... University of Alabama Press 2020 Book Spring 2021 Vol. 25 No. 1
Louisiana Coushatta Basket Makers: Traditional Knowledge, Resourcefulness, and Artistry as a Means of Survival Linda P. Langley
Denise E. Bates


In the 1880s the Coushatta tribe settled on Bayou Blue in southwestern Louisiana, where they rediscovered a basket making tradition that went back centuries. But this time basket making became... Louisiana State University Press 2021 Book Summer 2021 Vol. 25 No. 2
Ancestral Caddo Ceramic Traditions Duncan P. McKinnon
Jeffrey S. Girard
Timothy Perttula

The Caddo culture of southeastern Oklahoma, northeastern Texas, southwestern Arkansas, and northwestern Louisiana has a rich artistic tradition that dates back some 3,000 years to Woodland period ancestors and continues... Louisiana State University Press 2021 Book Summer 2021 Vol. 25 No. 2
The Cosmos Revealed: Precontact Mississippian Rock Art at Painted Bluff, Alabama Jan E. Simek
Erin E. Dunsmore
Johannes Loubser
Sierra M. Bow
Painted Bluff is a 400 foot high sandstone cliff on the Tennessee River in northern Alabama. It contains more than 130 paintings and engravings (pictographs) associated with the Mississippian culture... University of Alabama Press 2021 Book Summer 2021 Vol. 25 No. 2
Time, Typology, and Point Traditions in North Carolina Archaeology I. Randolph Daniel, Jr.



Projectile points are ubiquitous in the archaeological record. They are distinctive, numerous, and indestructible. Archeologists and amateurs have been collecting and studying them for years. In 1964, famed archaeologist Joffre... University of Alabama Press 2021 Book Summer 2021 Vol. 25 No. 2
Rock Art in an Indigenous Landscape: From Atlantic Canada to Chesapeake Bay Edward J. Lenik
Nancy L. Gibbs


This volume documents Native American rock art in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and eastern Quebec in Canada, and the six New England states plus New York, New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania,... Fall 2021 Vol. 25 No. 3
Feeding Cahokia: Early Agriculture in the North American Heartland Gayle J. Fritz



Between A.D. 700 and 950, a major population center of hundreds of mounds and settlements with thousands of native people developed on the floodplain of the Mississippi River opposite present... University of Alabama Press 2019 Book Spring 2019 Vol. 23 No. 1
A Study of Southwestern Archaeology Stephen H. Lekson



For more than thirty years, Stephen Lekson, an archaeologist at the University of Colorado, has been challenging conventional wisdom about Chaco Canyon, the magnificent prehistoric center in the desert of... University of Utah Press 2018 Book Spring 2019 Vol. 23 No. 1
Baking, Bourbon, and Black Drink: Foodways Archaeology in the American Southeast Tanya M. Peres



Food is the most basic need of all animals, and throughout history, humans have fulfilled this need by hunting, fishing, foraging, tending plants, and raising animals. Securing food is intertwined... University of Alabama Press 2018 Book Spring 2019 Vol. 23 No. 1
Secrets in the Dirt: Uncovering the Ancient People of Gault Mary S. Black



This is the story of the Gault site in Central Texas and of the archaeologists and others who have been studying it since its discovery in 1929. The site covers... Texas A&M University Press 2019 Book Summer 2019 Vol. 23 No. 2
Cahokia’s Complexities: Ceremonies and Politics of the First Mississippian Farmers Susan M. Alt



Cahokia, which developed around A.D. 1050 and then declined about 1350, was the largest and most important pre-Columbian city north of Mexico. Located on the Mississippi River flood plain just... University of Alabama Press 2018 Book Summer 2019 Vol. 23 No. 2
End of the Megafauna Ross D.E. MacPhee



Beginning about 50,000 years ago, very large animals that ranged over most of the planet began to go extinct. These gigantic species included the wooly mammoth and sabretooth cat, as... W. W. Norton & Co. 2019 Book Summer 2019 Vol. 23 No. 2
Seventeenth-Century Metallurgy on the Spanish Colonial Frontier: Pueblo and Spanish Interactions Noah H. Thomas



When the Spanish conquerors arrived in New Mexico in the early 1600s, the local Puebloans, like most New World people, had no knowledge of metallurgy. But to Europeans wealth was... University of Arizona Press 2018 Book Summer 2019 Vol. 23 No. 2
The Archaeology of Northern Slavery and Freedom Jame A. Delle



At the outbreak of the American Revolution in 1775, slavery was legal in all thirteen colonies, and the first census in 1790 counted 40,370 slaves north of the Mason-Dixon Line.... University Press of Florida 2019 Book Fall 2019 Vol. 23 No. 3
Revealing Greater Cahokia, North America’s First Native City Thomas Emerson, Brad H. Koldehoff, and Tamira Brennan



For five years from 2008 to 2012, over 100 archaeologists and other specialists conducted excavations in front of a new bridge being built across the Mississippi River connecting St. Louis,... Illinois State Archaeological Survey 2018 Book Fall 2019 Vol. 23 No. 3
Encountering Hopewell in the Twenty-First Century, Ohio and Beyond Brian G. Redmond, Bret J. Ruby, and Jarrod Burkes



When the first European-Americans entered the Ohio Valley, they were amazed by the massive earthworks they encountered—tall conical mounds, geometric works in the shape of circles, squares, and octagons, parallel... University of Akron Press 2019 Book Fall 2019 Vol. 23 No. 3
Second Creek Archaeology: A Glimpse into Mississippi’s Past Daniel A. LaDu and Ian W. Brown



Second Creek Archaeology describes an archaeological survey in one of Mississippi’s most historically and prehistorically rich areas just south of Natchez. The Natchez Indians, the only tribe still constructing and... Borgo Publishing 2019 Book Fall 2019 Vol. 23 No. 3
Thunder Go North: The Hunt for Sir Francis Drake’s Fair and Good Bay Melissa Darby



In 1577, Francis Drake, already notorious for his marauding on the Spanish Main, set out on a secret mission for Queen Elizabeth I to explore and claim the western coast... University of Utah Press 2019 Book Winter 2019-20 Vol. 23 No. 4
Ghost Fleet Awakened: Lake George’s Sunken Bateaux of 1758 Joseph W. Zarzynski



In the eighteenth century, bateaux (French for boats) were the most popular and versatile watercraft for the inland waterways of British and French colonial America. Hundreds of these small vessels... SUNY Press 2019 Book Winter 2019-20 Vol. 23 No. 4
Captain Kidd’s Lost Ship: The Wreck of the Quedagh Merchant Frederick H. Hanselmann



In 2007, a shipwreck was discovered just off the coast of Catalina Island in the Dominican Republic. Fortunately, it was reported to the authorities who promptly asked a team of... University Press of Florida 2019 Book Winter 2019-20 Vol. 23 No. 4
The Market for Mesoamerica: Reflections on the Sale of Pre-Columbian Antiquities Cara G. Tremain and Donna Yates



This timely volume examines the alarming rise of illicit collecting and trafficking in looted Mesoamerican antiquities, particularly those of the Maya. Beginning is the 1950s and accelerating in the 1960s,... University Press of Florida 2019 Book Winter 2019-20 Vol. 23 No. 4
Woodland Mounds in West Virginia Darla Spencer



Between about 500 B.C. and A.D. 500, Native Americans built thousands of mounds and earthworks in the Ohio River Valley. In what is now West Virginia, they built some 400... History Press 2019 Book Spring 2020 Vol. 24 No. 1
Origins of the Iroquois League: Narratives, Symbols, and Archaeology Anthony Wonderley, Martha Sempowski



Ranging from west to east, five tribes or nations of upstate New York—Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, and Mohawk—came together to form the League of the Iroquois. This league influenced American... Syracuse University Press 2019 Book Spring 2020 Vol. 24 No. 1
This Land is Their Land: The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving David J. Silverman



This book tells the history of the Wampanoag tribe of Massachusetts and Rhode Island from their first contacts with Europeans in the early 1500s, through their near extinction, and their... Bloomsbury 2019 Book Spring 2020 Vol. 24 No. 1
Archaic Earthworks of the Lower Mississippi Valley Jon L. Gibson



By his own account, Jon Gibson has been thinking about ancient mounds since 1956. Over some fifty years as a prominent Louisiana archaeologist, he has visited most of them and... History Press 2019 Book Spring 2020 Vol. 24 No. 1
The Mound Builder Myth: Fake History and the Hunt for a “Lost White Race” Jason Colavito



When European-Americans crossed the Appalachian Mountains at the end of the eighteenth century, they encountered huge, man-made earthen mounds of conical, geometrical, and animal shapes. They asked the local Native... University of Oklahoma Press 2020 Book Summer 2020 Vol. 24 No. 2
Prehistoric Games of North American Indians Barbara Voorhies



Games are ubiquitous in human societies. In fact, it is virtually impossible to find a human society where games are not an important part of the culture. Like language and... University of Utah Press 2017 Book Winter 2017-18 Vol. 21 No. 4
Mississippian Beginnings Gregory D. Wilson



The Mississippian culture dominated most of the Southeastern and much of the Midwestern parts of the United States from about A.D. 1000 to 1600. It was characterized by large villages... University of Florida Press 2017 Book Winter 2017-18 Vol. 21 No. 4
Talking Stone: Rock Art of the Cosos Paul Goldsmith



Award winning cinematographer Paul Goldsmith spent years filming and photographing the tens of thousands of Native American petroglyphs and pictographs of the Coso Range on the edge of the Mojave... University of Utah Press 2017 Book Winter 2017-18 Vol. 21 No. 4
A Little History of Archaeology Brian Fagan



No one tells the story of archaeology better than Brian Fagan, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The author of numerous books on archaeology in... Yale University 2018 Book Spring 2018 Vol. 22 No. 1
Landscapes of the Itza, Archaeology and Art History at Chichen Itza and Neighboring States Linnea Wren
Cynthia Kristan-Graham
Travis Nygard
Kaylee Spencer
Fourteen leading archaeologists and art historians contribute nine essays in this timely volume about the late Maya city-state of Chichén Itzá in northern Yucatán, Mexico. Chichén Itzá is a site... University Press of Florida 2018 Book Spring 2018 Vol. 22 No. 1
The Archaeology and History of Pueblo San Marcos Ann F. Ramenofsky
Kari L. Schleher


Located between Santa Fe and Albuquerque in the Galisteo Basin, Pueblo San Marcos is the largest pueblo ruin in the United States with 1,500 to 3,000 adobe rooms up to... University of New Mexico Press 2017 Book Spring 2018 Vol. 22 No. 1
Archaeological Remote Sensing in North America Duncan P. McKinnon and Bryan S. Haley



All around us, we experience the dizzying speed of technological development, including in the field of archaeology. While archaeologists are often thought of as men and women digging in ruins... University of Alabama Press 2017 Book Spring 2018 Vol. 22 No. 1
Out of the Cold: Archaeology on the Arctic Rim of North America Owen K. Mason and T. Max Friesen



Noted Arctic archaeologists Owen Mason of the University of Colorado and Max Friesen of the University of Toronto have authored this overview of archaeological investigations on the Arctic Rim of... SAA Press 2018 Book Summer 2018 Vol. 22 No. 2
The Oxford Handbook of Southwest Archaeology Barbara J. Mills
Severin Fowles


For more than a century, hundreds of professional archaeologists have been surveying, excavating, and studying the American Southwest. This hefty volume takes stock of what they have learned so far... Oxford University Press 2017 Book Summer 2018 Vol. 22 No. 2
Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past David Reich



Ancient DNA is revolutionizing archaeology. Recent advances have made it possible to extract usable DNA from ever-older samples, leading to vast stores of new information about how humans populated the... Pantheon Books 2018 Book Summer 2018 Vol. 22 No. 2
Re-Awakening Ancient Salish Sea Basketry: Fifty Years of Basketry Studies in Culture and Science Ed Carriere, Dale R. Croes



Ed Carriere, a Suquamish tribal elder and master basketmaker, and Dale Croes, an archaeologist at Washington State University, have both spent more than fifty years pursuing their interests in ancient... Northwest Anthropology 2018 Book Summer 2018 Vol. 22 No. 2
British Forts and Their Communities Christopher R. Decors and Zachary J.M. Beier



Traditionally, archaeologists interested in various types of forts have focused on their military and defensive features, protective walls, and armaments. This fascinating volume, however, studies the diverse communities that occupied... University Press of Florida 2018 Book Fall 2018 Vol. 22 No. 3
Archaeological Perspectives on Warfare on the Great Plains Andrew J. Clark
Douglas B. Bamforth


Thanks to Hollywood, every American knows that the Great Plains was a very violent place in the nineteenth century as Native Americans took up arms to resist European-American expansion. This... University Press of Colorado 2018 Book Fall 2018 Vol. 22 No. 3
The Secret Token: Myth, Obsession, and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke Andrew Lawler



In July 1587, ninety men, seventeen women, and eleven children sponsored by Sir Walter Raleigh and Queen Elizabeth landed on Roanoke Island in Pamlico Sound on the North Carolina coast.... University Press of Colorado 2018 Book Fall 2018 Vol. 22 No. 3
Mimbres Life and Society: The Mattocks Site of Southwestern New Mexico Patricia A. Gilman
Steven A. LeBlanc


The Mimbres were a pueblo people who flourished in southwestern New Mexico a thousand years ago. They are best known for their distinctive black, white, and red painted pottery that... University of Arizona Press 2017 Book Fall 2018 Vol. 22 No. 3
New Philadelphia Gerald A. McWorter
Kate Williams-McWorter


In 1831, Frank McWorter, a freed slave, bought a tract of land in Pike County, Illinois, to establish the town of New Philadelphia. By 1836, McWhorter had mapped out the... Path Press 2018 Book Winter 2018-19 Vol. 22, No. 4
Petroglyphs, Pictographs, and Projections: Native American Rock ARt in the Contemporary Cultural Landscape Richard A. Rogers



This book takes a novel approach to the study of rock art in the American Southwest by focusing on rock art in the contemporary cultural landscape—specifically its relationships with media... University of Utah Press 2018 Book Winter 2018-19 Vol. 22, No. 4
Blackbeard’s Sunken Prize: The 300-Year Voyage of Queen Anne’s Revenge Mark U. Wilde-Ramsing
Linda F. Carnes-McNaughton


In June 1718, Captain Edward Tache (pronounced Teach) ran his three-masted flagship aground off North Carolina’s Beaufort Inlet. Tache and his crew abandoned ship with all the valuables they could... University of North Carolina Press 2018 Book Winter 2018-19 Vol. 22, No. 4
Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan Paul F. Reed
Gary M. Brown


This volume examines the large Puebloan ruins in the middle San Juan River valley in the Four Corners region of northwestern New Mexico. While there are many ruins in the... SAR Press 2018 Book Winter 2018-19 Vol. 22, No. 4
The Archaeology of Villages in Eastern North America Jennifer Birch
Victor D. Thompson


This book takes a novel approach to the study of rock art in the American Southwest by focusing on rock art in the contemporary cultural landscape—specifically its relationships with media... University of Florida Press 2018 Book Spring 2019 Vol. 23 No. 1
The Powhatan Landscape: An Archaeological History of the Algonquian Chesapeake Martin D. Gallivan



When the first English colonists arrived at Jamestown in the Chesapeake region of what is now Virginia, they found the region populated by Native Americans living in scattered villages along... University of Florida Press 2016 Book Fall 2016 Vol. 20 No. 3
The Spike Buck Site: Archaeology of the Cherokee Town of Quannassee, 1580-1724 Dan F. Morse
Phyllis A. Morse


The Spike Buck site lies on the Hiwassee River in Hayesville in southwestern North Carolina. It has been identified as the Cherokee town of Quannassee. Captain George Chicken gave a... Borgo Publishing 2016 Book Fall 2016 Vol. 20 No. 3
The Pueblo Bonito Mounds of Chaco Canyon: Material Culture and Fauna Patricia L. Crown



Pueblo Bonito is the largest and most famous of the great houses in Chaco Canyon, the great Native center in the desert of northwestern New Mexico. In front of the... University of New Mexico Press 2016 Book Fall 2016 Vol. 20 No. 3
Cuban Archaeology in the Caribbean Ivan Roksandic



In this volume thirteen international researchers from Cuba and elsewhere explore the settlement and early development of Cuba. As the largest and most centrally located island in the Caribbean, Cuba... University of Florida Press 2016 Book Winter 2016-17 Vol. 20 No. 4
Coming of Age in Chicago, The 1893 World’s Fair and Caslescence of American Anthropology Curtis M. Hinsley, David R. Wilcox



The Chicago World’s Fair of 1893 is best known for its portrayal of the “White City” a futuristic vision of urban life in America and the world inspired by the... University of Nebraska Press 2016 Book Winter 2016-17 Vol. 20 No. 4
Strangers in a New Land: What Archaeology Reveals About the First Americans J.M. Adovasio, David Pedler



The most hotly debated question in American archaeology for the past two decades concerns the fundamental questions: Who were the First Americans? From where did they come? How did they... Firefly Books 2016 Book Winter 2016-17 Vol. 20 No. 4
The Archaeology of Rock Art of Swordfish Cave Clayton G. Lebow, Douglas G. Harro, and Rebecca L. McKim



Swordfish Cave is a well-known rock art location on Vandenberg Air Force Base in south-central California. By the mid-1990s it was clear that the site was deteriorating due to dust... University of Utah Press 2016 Book Winter 2016-17 Vol. 20 No. 4
Early Native Americans in West Virginia: The Fort Ancient People Darla Spencer



Around A.D.1000, Native American culture in the Eastern woodlands of North America underwent dramatic changes. For the first time, the practice of large scale farming of corn, beans, and squash... History Press 2016 Book Spring 2017 Vol. 21 No. 1
Ancient America: Fifty Archaeological Sites to See for Yourself Kenneth L. Feder



Archaeologist Kenneth Feder leads us on a cross-country odyssey to fifty of the most interesting and accessible archaeological sites in the United States. Beginning with a concise outline of American... Rowman & Littlefield 2017 Book Spring 2017 Vol. 21 No. 1
The White Shaman Mural Carolyn E. Boyd
Kim Cox


The White Shaman mural is a spectacular prehistoric composition on the wall of a small cave on the Pecos River in southern Texas. It measures some twenty-six-feet wide by thirteen-feet... University of Texas Press 2016 Book Spring 2017 Vol. 21 No. 1
Musket Ball and Small Shot Identification, a Guide Daniel M. Sivilich



Until recently battlefield archaeologists could learn little from the musket balls and other lead shot discovered on the fields of conflict. New equipment and research techniques have changed all that.... University of Oklahoma Press 2016 Book Spring 2017 Vol. 21 No. 1
Projective Points and the Illinois Landscape: People, Time, and Place Robert J. Reber



This volume contains thousands of full-color photographs of mostly stone projectile points, knives, and cache-blades from all over Illinois. More than 100 different types are represented, with multiple examples illustrating... Illinois State Archaeological Survey 2017 Book Summer 2017 Vol. 21 No. 2
Visual Culture of the Ancient Americas: Contemporary Perspectives Andrew Finegold
Ellen Hoobler


This collection of interesting and diverse essays is an important contribution to the study of ancient American art history, a field of study that has only flourished in the past... University of Oklahoma Press 2017 Book Summer 2017 Vol. 21 No. 2
Archaeological Perspectives on the French in the New World Elizabeth M. Scott



The story of French settlements in the Americas is largely confined to Québec and New Orleans, but this volume demonstrates that there is much more to be told. Thirteen authors... University Press of Florida 2017 Book Summer 2017 Vol. 21 No. 2
The Archaeology of Houses and Households in the Native Southeast Benjamin A. Steere



The study compiles the largest detailed architectural data sets for the Southeast to seek to understand the developmental history of houses and household in the region for the Woodland, Mississippian,... University of Alabama Press 2017 Book Summer 2017 Vol. 21 No. 2
A Grand Adventure: The Lives of Helge and Anne Stine Ingstad and Their Discovery of a Viking Settlement in North America Benedicte Ingstad



In 1960, Helge and Anne Stine Ingstad discovered the remains of a Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows on the northern shore of Newfoundland. Helge was a Norwegian lawyer turned... McGill-Queen's University Press 2017 Book Fall 2017 Vol. 21 No. 3
Recognizing People in the Prehistoric Southwest Jill E. Neitzel



While most archaeological studies focus on architecture and material remains, this volume focuses on the appearance, speech, and associated identity messages of the various prehistoric people of the Southwest from... University of Utah Press 2017 Book Fall 2017 Vol. 21 No. 3
Land of Water, City of the Dead: Religion and Cahokia’s Emergence Sarah E. Baires



Located twelve miles east of St. Louis in the American Bottom, Cahokia was the largest American city north of Mexico. With a peak population of 20,000 or more, it was... University of Alabama Press 2017 Book Fall 2017 Vol. 21 No. 3
Dry Creek: Archaeology and Paleoecology of a Late Pleistocene Alaskan Hunting Camp W. Roger Powers
R. Dale Guthrie
John F. Hoffecker
Edited by Ted Goebel
The Dry Creek paleo-archaeology site located in the Nenana River Valley of central Alaska is one of the most important sites on Beringia, the land bridge between Siberia and Alaska... Texas A&M University Press 2017 Book Fall 2017 Vol. 21 No. 3
Archaeology of African American Life in the Upper Mid-Atlantic Michael J. Gail and Richard F. Veit



This is the first in-depth look at the archaeology of African American life in the Upper Mid-Atlantic—New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Eighteen established and emerging scholars present thirteen... University of Alabama Press 2017 Book Winter 2017-18 Vol. 21 No. 4
Living the Ancient Southwest David Grant Noble



David Grant Noble has been writing and editing books about archaeology in the American Southwest for some 40 years. Even though he is not a trained archaeologist, Noble is generally... School for Advanced Research 2014 Book Summer 2015 Vol. 19 No. 2
Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People Elizabeth A. Fenn



In 1804-05, Lewis and Clark spent the winter with the Mandan people on the banks of the Missouri River in what is now central North Dakota. They described a generous... Hill & Wang 2014 Book Summer 2015 Vol. 19 No. 2
The Chaco Meridian: One Thousand Years of Political and Religious Power in the Ancient Southwest (2nd Edition) Stephen H. Lekson



University of Colorado archaeologist Stephen Lekson rocked the archaeological world in 1999 with the first edition of this work. In it he sets forth a general theory of Chaco Canyon,... Rowman & Littlefield 2015 Book Summer 2015 Vol. 19 No. 2
Ancient Teotihuacan: Early Urbanism in Central Mexico George L. Cowgill



Beginning in about 150 B.C., a great city developed in the fertile Teotihuacan (Nahuatl spelling) Valley some 25 miles northeast of what is now downtown Mexico City. Before long it... Cambridge University Press 2015 Book Fall 2015 Vol. 19 No. 3
Medieval Mississippians: The Cahokia World Timothy R. Pauketat
Susan M. Alt


This collection of 17 essays by 28 archaeologists and Native Americans explores the world of the Mississippians, Native Americans united by a common culture that dominated the Southeastern United States... SAR Press 2015 Book Fall 2015 Vol. 19 No. 3
Beliefs and Rituals in Archaic Eastern North America: An Interpretive Guide Cheryl Classen



Appalachian State University archaeologist Cheryl Claassen has produced this outstanding guide to the places, rituals, and beliefs of the Archaic period in the Eastern United States and Canada. The Archaic... University of Alabama Press 2015 Book Fall 2015 Vol. 19 No. 3
The Lost World of the Old Ones: Discoveries in the Ancient Southwest David Roberts



David Roberts writes about mountaineering, adventure, exploration, Western history, and anthropology. In this engaging travelogue, he and two of his mountaineering compatriots set out to explore some of the remote... W.W. Norton & Co. 2015 Book Fall 2015 Vol. 19 No. 3
Center Places and Cherokee Towns Christopher B. Rodning



Tulane University archaeologist Christopher Rodning builds on his own work at the Coweeta Creek site in North Carolina to develop a picture of Cherokee towns in the southern Appalachians from... University of Alabama Press 2015 Book Winter 2015-16 Vol. 19 No. 4
Poverty Point: Revealing the Forgotten City Jenny Ellerbe
Diana M. Greenlee


Poverty Point in northeastern Louisiana was the largest and most complex settlement in the long Archaic period of American human occupation. During its heyday between 1700 and 1100 B.C. it... Louisiana State University Press 2015 Book Winter 2015-16 Vol. 19 No. 4
Archaeology of the Sacred: Adena-Hopewell Astronomy and Landscape Archaeology William F. Romain



When European-Americans first entered the Ohio River Valley they were amazed by the numerous earthen mounds and huge geometric earthworks, particularly those found in southern Ohio. Local Native Americans knew... The Ancient Earthworks Project 2015 Book Winter 2015-16 Vol. 19 No. 4
Corey Village and the Canyon World: Implications from Archaeology and Beyond Jack Rossen



The Iroquois, or Haudenosaunee, originally consisted of five tribes—the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca—who lived in central New York State and formed a powerful confederacy. (The Tuscarora, who began... Syracuse University Press 2015 Book Winter 2015-16 Vol. 19 No. 4
Ancient Ruins and Rock Art of the Southwest David Grant Noble



David Grant Noble has updated his essential guidebook to archaeological ruins in the greater Southwest. In this new, fourth edition, he describes more ruins in more places and adds new... Taylor Trade Publishing 2015 Book Spring 2016 Vol. 20, No. 1
Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland Vincus P. Steponaitis
C. Margaret Scarry


Moundville, near Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is one of the largest prehistoric mound-builder complexes in the United States. The central site contains some 29 earthen mounds located on the banks of the... University Press of Florida 2016 Book Spring 2016 Vol. 20, No. 1
Oblique Views: Aerial Photography and Southwest Archaeology Charles Lindbergh
Anne Morrow Lindbergh
Adriel Heisey

In 1929, two years after his epic cross-Atlantic solo flight, Charles Lindberg and his new wife Anne embarked on another novel exploration. Alfred V. Kidder, who was excavating at Pecos... Museum of New Mexico Press 2016 Book Spring 2016 Vol. 20, No. 1
First Pennyslvanians: The Archaeology of Native Americans in Pennsylvania Kurt W. Carr
Roger W. Moeller


This copiously illustrated investigation of the history of Native Americans in Pennsylvania is a significant addition to regional archaeological surveys. This state has a diversity of climatic and geological zones... Penn State University Press 2015 Book Spring 2016 Vol. 20, No. 1
The Wichita Indians, People of the Grass House Susan A. Holland



Summer 2016 Vol. 20 No. 2
First Coastal Californians Lynn H. Gamble



The California coast was teeming with food, drawing early Native Americans and nourishing them for millennia. The Pacific Ocean served up a rich variety of fish, shellfish, and marine mammals.... School for Advanced Research Press 2015 Book Summer 2016 Vol. 20 No. 2
Masters of Empire: Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America Michael A. McDonnell



Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland Hill and Wang 2015 Book Summer 2016 Vol. 20 No. 2
Jungle of Stone: The True Story of Two Men, their Extraordinary Journey, and the Discovery of the Lost Civilization of the Maya William Carlsen



In October 1839, John Lloyd Stephens, an American lawyer-diplomat, and Frederick Catherwood, a British architect and artist, set sail for Central America. Stephens was to take up a diplomatic post... William Morrow 2016 Book Summer 2016 Vol. 20 No. 2
The African Burial Ground in New York City Andrea E. Frohne



In the late 1980s, the General Services Administration (GSA) advanced plans to build a large new federal office building in lower New York City in a large complex of city,... Syracuse University Press 2015 Book Fall 2016 Vol. 20 No. 3
The Archaeology of French and Indian War Forts Lawrence E. Babits
Stephanie Gandulla


The Seven Years War of 1756 to 1763 saw the great empires of France and Britain and all their allies fight for control of trade and colonies on four continents.... University Press of Florida 2013 Book Spring 2014 Vol. 18 No. 1
Rock Art of the Grand Canyon Region Don D. Christensen
Jerry Dickey
Steven M. Freers

Over the past 25 years, authors Don Christensen, Jerry Dickey, and Steven Freers have been recording and studying rock art at 450 sites in and around the Grand Canyon from... Sunbelt Publications 2013 Book Spring 2014 Vol. 18 No. 1
The Archaeology of Hollywood Paul G. Bahn



The Archaeology of Hollywood is a light-hearted investigation of a magical era that is more a state of mind than a compact physical place. It is instead a group of... Rowman & Littlefield 2014 Book Spring 2014 Vol. 18 No. 1
Historical Archaeology of the Delaware Valley, 1600-1850 Richard Veit
David Orr


The Delaware River Valley runs through the Mid-Atlantic states of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Maryland, with its center in Philadelphia. Its diverse population includes a wide variety... University of Tennessee Press 2014 Book Summer 2014 Vol 18 No. 2
Caddo Connections: Cultural Interaction Within and Beyond the Caddo World Jeffrey S. Girard
Timothy K. Perttula
Mary Beth Trubitt

The Caddo area of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana was home to a diverse people and culture that had its origins in the A.D. 900s and continues today. It developed... Rowman & Littlefield 2014 Book Summer 2014 Vol 18 No. 2
Mesoamerican Plazas: Arenas of Community and Power Lemocjorp Tsukamoto
Takeshi Inomata


In this fascinating volume, 16 scholars take a detailed look at the great plazas of prehistoric Mesoamerican cities including such magnificent examples as Teotihuacán, Palenque, and Monte Albán. Traditionally, archaeologists... University of Arizona Press 2014 Book Summer 2014 Vol 18 No. 2
Mammoths and Mastodons of the Ice Age Adrian Lister



At the end of the last ice age, many large mammals went extinct. Among them were the mammoths and mastodons, which finally disappeared for good only 4,000 years ago. Closely... Firefly Books 2014 Book Summer 2014 Vol 18 No. 2
New Lives for Ancient and Extinct Crops Paul Minis



Modern agriculture is bringing about the dramatic narrowing of food species throughout the world. Crops that were domesticated and developed by farmers over thousands of years into tens of thousands... University of Arizona Press 2014 Book Fall 2014 Vol. 18 No. 3
From These Honored Dead: Historical Archaeology of the American Civil War Clarence R. Geier



One hundred and fifty years after Lee’s surrender, archaeologists using the latest technology are adding important new insights to the American Civil War story that has been too often told... University Press of Florida 2014 Book Fall 2014 Vol. 18 No. 3
Clovis Caches: Recent Discoveries and New Research Bruce B. Huckell
J. David Kilby


About 13,500 years ago, near the end of the last Ice Age, the Clovis people of North America developed distinctive fluted-stone spear points and other tools that allowed them to... University of New Mexico Press 2014 Book Fall 2014 Vol. 18 No. 3
Arrows and Atl Atls: A guide to the Archaeology of Beringia E. James Dixon



Noted arctic archaeologist James Dixon has produced the first comprehensive survey of the very important archaeology of Beringia, the area from the Verkhoyansk Range in Siberia to Alaska and the... National Park Service 2013 Book Fall 2014 Vol. 18 No. 3
Constructing Community: The Archaeology of Early Villages in Central New Mexico Alison E. Rautman



The Salinas region is home to majestic ruins of Spanish mission churches and historic pueblos, such as those seen at Abo, Quarai, and Gran Quivira in Salinas Pueblo Missions National... University of Arizona Press 2014 Book Winter 2014 Vol. 18 No. 4
Discovering the Olmecs: An Unconventional History David C. Grove



The Olmecs of southern Mexico are known as the “mother culture” of Mesoamerica because they made the first stone monuments, were the first to use a calendar, and produced early... University of Texas Press 2014 Book Winter 2014 Vol. 18 No. 4
The Archaeology of American Cities Nan A. Rothschild



One of the many fun things about America archaeology is that it is continually seeking new areas to explore and new sub-disciplines to cultivate. Urban archaeology is one of the... University Press of Florida 2014 Book Winter 2014 Vol. 18 No. 4
Ceramic Production in Early Hispanic California: Craft, Economy, and Trade on the Frontier of New Spain Russell K. Skowronek, M. James Blackman, Ronald L. Bishop



This book is an important study of Spanish and Mexican ceramic production in California, and its impact on the economy and the Native people of the Spanish frontier. Using neutron... University of Arizona Press 2014 Book Winter 2014 Vol. 18 No. 4
The Invisible History of the Human Race Christine Kenneally



Award-winning Australian journalist Christine Kenneally has produced an excellent layman’s guide to the 21st-century’s most promising new science concerning DNA and the human genome. Every day we are peppered with... Viking Press 2014 Book Spring 2015 Vol. 19 No. 1
Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble Marilyn Johnson



Author Marilyn Johnson assumes that everyone in the sandbox wanted to grow up to be an archaeologist. In writing this delightful travelogue she takes on the task of seeing the... Harper Collins 2014 Book Spring 2015 Vol. 19 No. 1
The Archaeology of Smoking and Tobacco Georgia L. Fox



Nothing in the material culture of the Americas is more ubiquitous that tobacco. From the earliest Native Americans to the present diverse society, tobacco has played an important role in... University Press of Florida 2015 Book Spring 2015 Vol. 19 No. 1
Kukulcan’s Realm Marilyn A. Masson
Carlos Peraza Lope


Located in the northern part of Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula, Mayapán was the last great city of the Maya, flourishing from about A.D.1200 to 1450. The densely settled city is surrounded... University Press of Colorado 2014 Book Spring 2015 Vol. 19 No. 1
Hopewell Ceremonial Landscapes of Ohio: More than Mounds and Geometric Earthworks Mark J. Lynott



When Europeans first encountered the great earthen mounds and geometric earthworks of southern Ohio, they were so amazed at their size and complexity that they refused to attribute them to... Oxbow Books 2015 Book Summer 2015 Vol. 19 No. 2
Digging Miami Robert S. Carr



Miami was the last of America’s large cities to get going. It was not incorporated until 1896, and seldom visited before that. But once development started, it grew with abandon,... University Press of Florida 2012 Book Winter 2012-13 Vol. 16 No. 4
Mound Builders and Monument Makers of the Northern Great Lakes, 1200-1600 Meghan C.L. Howey



This is the first study of mounds, earthworks, and other earthen monuments in northern Michigan, an area somewhat outside of the more intense and better studied mound building areas of... University of Oklahoma Press 2012 Book Winter 2012-13 Vol. 16 No. 4
Late Pleistocene Archaeology & Ecology in the Far Northeast Claude Chapdelaine



This fascinating study examines the first American occupation of the far Northeast—the peninsula between the Hudson and St. Lawrence Rivers comprising New York east of the Hudson, the six New... Texas A&M University Press 2012 Book Winter 2012-13 Vol. 16 No. 4
Shovel Ready: Archaeology and Roosevelt’s New Deal for America Bermard K. Means



During the darkest days of the Great Depression in 1932-33, more than one in five Americans was out of work. The economy had shrunk to a fraction of what it... University of Alabama Press 2012 Book Spring 2013 vol 17 No. 4
Climate and Culture Change in North America: A.D. 900-1600 William C. Foster



Modern climate change is a worldwide political issue and a constant topic of research and debate. But climatic cycles are well documented in Europe over the past 3,000 years, and... University of Texas Press 2012 Book Spring 2013 vol 17 No. 1
DNA For Archaeologists Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith
K. Ann Horsburgh


We all know that the study of ancient DNA can open up exciting new avenues of ancient research. We know it has the potential to tell us with certainty about... Left Coast Press 2012 Book Spring 2013 vol 17 No. 1
Archaeology, Narrative, and the Politics of the Past: The View from Southern Maryland Julia A. King



In this innovative work, Julia King explores how historical narratives shape and often distort the archaeological and historical record. Focusing on Maryland’s beautiful Chesapeake Bay region, King explores St. Mary’s... University of Tennessee Press 2012 Book Spring 2013 vol 17 No. 1
Mound Sites of the Ancient South: A Guide to the Mississippian Chiefdoms Eric. E. Bowne



The great prehistoric mounds of the American South remain today as impressive monuments of a complex culture that thrived between about A.D. 900 and 1600. While this Mississippian period was... University of Georgia Press 2013 Book Summer 2013 vol 17 No. 2
Southwestern Pithouse Communities, A.D. 200-900 Lisa C. Young
Sarah A. Herr


Native people of the American Southwest began a major transition in life style around A.D. 200 when they began to develop agricultural communities and the more or less permanent residences... University of Arizona Press 2012 Book Summer 2013 vol 17 No. 2
Crafting History in the Northern Plains: A Political Economy of the Heart River Region 1400-1750 Mark D. Mitchell



Near the present day city of Bismarck, North Dakota, at the confluence of the Heart and Missouri rivers, was the homeland of the Mandan people. From about A.D. 1400 to... University of Arizona Press 2013 Book Summer 2013 vol 17 No. 2
Becoming White Clay: A History and Archaeology of Jicarilla Apache Enclavement B. Sunday Eiselt



For nearly 200 years the Jicarilla band of the Apache people thrived at the intersection of Pueblo Indian and Spanish colonial settlements in northern New Mexico. Part of the much... University of Utah Press 2012 Book Summer 2013 vol 17 No. 2
Time and Time Again: History, Rephotography, and Preservation in the Chaco World Lucy R. Lippard
Peter Goin


Chaco Canyon, in the desert of northwestern New Mexico, is home to one of the most complex and enigmatic ancient ruins in North America. There is a cluster of eight... Museum of New Mexico Press 2013 Book Fall 2013 vol 17 No. 3
Maize: Origin, Domestication, and Its Role in the Development of Culture Duccio Bonavia



Maize, better known as corn, is the basis of New World agriculture and thus American civilization. Yet its origins and domestication remains one of the most difficult problems of American... Cambridge University Press 2013 Book Fall 2013 vol 17 No. 3
Nine Mile Canyon: The Archaeological History of an American Treasure Jerry D. Spangler



Nine Mile Canyon in east central Utah is actually a 45-mile long, verdant canyon surrounded by a desolate plateau. (The name may in fact come from early settlers W.A. Miles,... University of Utah Press 2013 Book Fall 2013 vol 17 No. 3
Native and Spanish New Worlds: Sixteenth-Century Entradas in the American Southwest and Southeast Clay Mathers
Jeffrey M. Mitchem
Charles M. Haecker

Less than 20 years after the conquest of the Aztec Empire in 1521, Spanish entradas—armed expeditions seeking wealth and territory—began probing the Southern United States. The impact of these entradas... University of Arizona Press 2013 Book Fall 2013 vol 17 No. 3
Painters in Prehistory: Archaeology and Art of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands Harry J. Shafer



The region around the confluence of the Pecos River and the Rio Grande in south Texas is one of dry, rugged canyons and scenic vistas. Preserved on the limestone cliffs... Trinity University Press 2013 Book Winter 2013-14 vol 17 No. 4
Becoming Brothertown: Native American Ethnogenesis and Endurance in the Modern World Craig N. Cipolla



The story of Brothertown begins with the story of Samson Occom, a Mohegan Indian who spoke fluent English and adopted the customs of Europeans of mid-17th century New England. Occom... University of Arizona Press 2013 Book Winter 2013-14 vol 17 No. 4
Pinson Mounds: Middle Woodland Ceremonialism in the Midsouth Robert C. Mainfort



Pinson Mounds is a stunning complex of Middle Woodland mounds and earthworks that tower above the western Tennessee landscape, 10 miles south of Jackson. Around A.D. 100, Pinson Mounds was... University of Arkansas Press 2013 Book Winter 2013-14 vol 17 No. 4
The First Rocky Mountaineers: Coloradoans Before Colorado Marcel Kornfeld



This important volume explores the early hunters and gatherers who populated Colorado’s Middle Park, a natural basin high in the Rocky Mountains. At the end of the last Ice Age... University of Utah Press 2013 Book Winter 2013-14 vol 17 No. 4
Buried Beneath Us: Discovering the Ancient Cities of the Americas Anthony Aveni
Katherine Roy


This book for young people (age 10 and up) tells the story of the development of cities via an examination of four major ancient American ones—Cahokia, Tenochtitlan, Cuzco, and Copán.... Roaring Brook Press 2013 Book Spring 2014 Vol. 18 No. 1
Mimbres Lives and Landscapes Margaret C. Nelson
Michelle Hegmon


From about A.D. 900 to 1130 a Puebloan people flourished in and around the Mimbres River valley of southwestern New Mexico. Their greatest legacy is a remarkable body of pottery... SAR Press 2011 Book Winter 2011-12 Vol. 15 No. 3
Visualizing the Sacred: Cosmic Visions, Regionalism, and the Art of the Mississippian World George E. Lankford
E. Kent Reilly III
James Garber

Since 1993, scholars of the mound building cultures of the Midwest and Southeast have gathered at Texas State University at San Marcos to share ideas and information on the religion... University of Texas Press 2011 Book Winter 2011-12 Vol. 15 No. 4
The Swift Creek Gift: Vessel Exchange on the Atlantic Coast Neil J. Wallis



During the second half of the Woodland Period (ca. A.D. 100 to 850) Swift Creek Complicated Stamped pottery gained widespread popularity across much of the Southeast, becoming common in sites... University of Alabama Press 2011 Book Winter 2011-12 Vol. 15 No. 4
Ceramic Makers’ Marks Erica Gibson



Since ceramics, both prehistoric and historic, preserve so well, they are of invaluable use to archaeologists in identifying and dating cultural layers. In American historical archaeology, makers’ marks on ceramics... Left Coast Press 2011 Book Winter 2011-12 Vol. 15 No. 4
The Archaeology of Antislavery Resistance Terrance M. Welk



This fascinating study of resistance to African slavery in North America is a very important contribution to the relatively new and growing field of slavery archaeology. Author Terrance Weik, an... University Press of Florida 2012 Book Spring 2012 Vol. 15 No. 4
Stone of Kings: In Search of the Lost Jade of the Maya Gerald Helferich



For the Maya and other peoples of ancient Mesoamerica, jade was the most prized possession of all. Great quantities of it were used to adorn Maya kings and nobles, both... Globe Pequot Press 2012 Book Spring 2012 Vol. 16 No. 1
Stone Artifacts of Texas Indians Ellen Sue Turner
Thomas R. Hester
Richard L. McReynolds

This comprehensive reference work is a greatly expanded third edition of a classic work. It boasts twice as many illustrations—all drawn from actual specimens by McReynolds—plus charts, geographic distribution maps,... Taylor Trade Publishing 2011 Book Spring 2012 Vol. 16 No. 1
On the Edge of Purgatory: An Archaeology of Place in Hispanic Colorado Bonnie J. Clark



In the early 1600s, Spaniards from Mexico colonized what is now southern Colorado at the northernmost reaches of New Spain. Isolated on the far frontier of a vast empire, these... University of Nebraska Press 2011 Book Spring 2012 Vol. 16 No. 1
Winds from the North: Tewa Origins and Historical Anthropology Scott G. Ortman



Perhaps the most enduring controversy in Southwestern archaeology is what happened to the people who abandoned Mesa Verde and the Four Corners region in the late 13th century. By A.D.... University of Utah Press 2012 Book Summer 2012 Vol. 16 No. 1
Virginia City: Secrets of a Western Past Ronald M. James



Virginia City begins with the story of a tiny bottle that was smashed to pieces in the African-American Boston Saloon. It was excavated by the author’s 14-year-old son, who recovered... University of Nebraska Press 2012 Book Summer 2012 Vol. 16 No. 2
Chinese Export Porcelains Andrew D. Madsen
Carolyn L. White


Archaeologists heavily depend on ceramics, both prehistoric and historic, to identify and date cultural deposits. They are virtually indestructible, retaining designs and colors centuries longer than most materials. As the... Left Coast Press 2011 Book Summer 2012 Vol. 16 No. 2
Perspectives on Prehistoric Trade and Exchange in California and the Great Basin Richard E. Hughes



This collection of 13 essays examines prehistoric trade in California and the Great Basin, focusing on how material got from its source of origin to the place where it was... University of Utah Press 2012 Book Summer 2012 Vol. 16 No. 2
Hisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water Christian E. Downum



The San Francisco Peaks of northern Arizona rise dramatically from the surrounding desert plain to an elevation of 12,637 feet. Despite receiving abundant winter snows and summer thunderstorms, most of... SAR Press 2012 Book Fall 2012 Vol. 16 No. 3
Jefferson’s Poplar Forest: Unearthing A Virginia Plantation Barbara J. Heath
Jack Gary


Thomas Jefferson and his wife Martha inherited Poplar Forest plantation from her father in 1773. From then until his death in 1826, Jefferson used it as an investment (growing tobacco... University Press of Florida 2012 Book Fall 2012 Vol. 16 No. 3
Late Prehistoric Florida: Archaeology at the Edge of the Mississippian World Keith Ashley
Nancy Marie White


This collection of 12 essays by some of the most prominent researchers in the field examines the latest research and most recent excavations throughout Florida for the Mississippian period—A.D. 1000... University Press of Florida 2012 Book Fall 2012 Vol. 16 No. 3
People of the Black Sun: A People of the Longhouse Novel Kathleen O'Neal Gear
W. Michael Gear


Since 1990, Kathleen and Michael Gear, both trained as professional archaeologists, have been writing best-selling novels about the prehistoric people of North America. In all they have produced some 33... TOR Books 2012 Fall 2012 Vol. 16 No. 3
Royal Cities of the Ancient Maya Michael D. Coe
Barry Burkhoff


If you’re looking for a great Christmas gift for a person who loves the ancient Maya, this is it. Noted Maya scholar Michael Coe and renowned photographer Barry Burkoff have... Vendome Press 2012 Book Winter 2012-13 Vol. 16 No. 3
Cradle of Gold: The Story of Hiram Bingham, a Real-Life Indiana Jones, and the Search for Machu Picchu Christopher Heaney



Today, the Inca outpost of Machu Picchu, located on the border between the high Peruvian Andes and the Amazon Basin, is one of the most visited tourist destinations in the... Palgrave Macmillan 2010 Book Summer 2010 Vol. 14 No. 2
Prehistory, Personality, and Place: Emil W. Haury and the Mogollon Controversy Jefferson Reid
Stephanie Whittlesey


In the fall of 1930 and the summer of 1931, two young archaeologists set out to survey the archaeological sites of the southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona mountains. Traveling... University of Arizona Press 2010 Book Summer 2010 Vol. 14 No. 2
TVA Archaeology: Seventy-five years of Prehistoric Site Research Erin E. Prichard
Todd m. Ahlman


The Tennessee Valley Authority was created in the depths of the Great Depression to bring cheap power and economic development to an especially hard hit region of the country. The... University of Tennessee Press 2010 Book Summer 2010 Vol. 14 No. 2
In the Places of the Spirits David Grant Noble



For 40 years David Grant Noble has been exploring the ancient and modern Native American cultures of the American Southwest and explaining them to thousands of Americans. Trained in literature... School for Advanced Research Press 2010 Book Winter 2010-11 Vol. 14 No. 3
Olmec: Colossal Masterworks of Ancient Mexico Kathleen Berrin
Virginia M. Fields


Many students of Mesoamerica consider the Olmec to be the “mother culture” of the region from which the Maya, Zapotecs, Toltecs, Aztecs, and others sprang. While this may be a... Yale University Press 2010 Book Winter 2010-11 Vol. 14 No. 4
Leaving Mesa Verde: Peril and Change in the Thirteenth-Century Southwest Timothy A. Kohler
Mark D. Varien
Aaron M. Wright

In the last half of the 13th century, the Puebloan people living in and around Mesa Verde in southern Colorado left, never to return. This was no inconsequential population. An... University of Arizona Press 2010 Book Winter 2010-11 Vol. 14 No. 4
Archaeology at Colonial Brunswick Stanley South



Noted historical archaeologist Stanley South recounts the decade-long excavation of this important port on the Cape Fear River south of Wilmington, North Carolina. Brunswick was founded in 1726 and served... N.C. Department of Cultural Resources 2010 Book Winter 2010-11 Vol. 14 No. 4
Archaeology of Louisiana Mark A. Rees



In this new volume, 27 distinguished scholars provide an up-to-date synopsis of the archaeological record of Louisiana from the first Americans some 13,000 years ago to 20th-century New Orleans. It... Louisiana State University Press 2010 Book Spring 2011 Vol. 15 No. 4
How Chiefs Became Kings: Divine Kingship and the Rise of Archaic States in Ancient Hawai’i Patrick Vinton Kirch



One of the perplexing problems in anthropology is the early emergence of large-scale social organization that is often called the “archaic state.” This polity is characterized by distinct groups that... University of California Press 2010 Book Spring 2011 Vol. 15 No. 1
The Archaeology of American Capitalism Christopher N. Matthews



Drawing on a wide range of examples from New York City urban life to California mining camps, this compact study examines the material culture of capitalism in America and illustrates... University Press of Florida 2010 Book Spring 2011 Vol. 15 No. 1
New Philadelphia: An Archaeology of Race in the Heartland Paul Shackel



In 1836 Frank McWorter, a Kentucky slave who bought his freedom, founded the town of New Philadelphia on the west-central Illinois prairie. The town prospered, then declined. In 1869 the... University of California Press 2011 Book Spring 2011 Vol. 15 No. 1
The Eastern Archaic, Historicized Kenneth E. Sassaman



Kenneth Sassaman of the University of Florida has produced a much needed synthesis and reevaluation of the Archaic Period east of the Mississippi River. As Sassaman points out, the Archaic... AltaMira Press 2010 Book Summer 2011 Vol. 15 No. 1
Pueblo Peoples on the Pajarito Plateau David E. Stuart



The Pajarito Plateau of northern New Mexico is home to Bandelier National Monument and its ancient cliff dwellings as well as Los Alamos National Laboratory, birthplace of the atom bomb.... University of New Mexico Press 2011 Book Summer 2011 Vol. 15 No. 2
Faking Ancient Mesoamerica Nancy L. Kelker
Karen O. Bruhns


“To a museum professional ‘fake’ is the ultimate F-word,” and more than 40 percent of pre-Colombian pieces from Mesoamerica in museums and private collections are fakes, according to the authors... Left Coast Press 2010 Book Summer 2011 Vol. 15 No. 2
The River and the Railroad: An Archaeological History of Reno Mary Ringhoff
Edward J. Stoner


Reno, Nevada began in 1868 as railroad town between the Truckee River and the transcontinental railroad. The ever expanding main line of the old Central Pacific has bisected the city... University of Nevada Press 2011 Book Summer 2011 Vol. 15 No. 2
HMS Fowey Lost and Found Russel K. Skowronek
George R. Fischer


In 1978, an underwater treasure hunter happened onto a shipwreck in Biscayne National Monument (now a national park) near Miami, Florida. Mistakenly believing he had found a sunken Spanish treasure... University Press of Florida 2009 Book Spring 2009 Vol. 13 No. 1
Archaeological Landscapes on the High Plains Laura L. Scheiber
Bonnie J. Clark


The High Plains of this study is the short grass prairie between the Rocky Mountains and the better-watered tall grass prairies to the east. Water and trees are scarce, and... University Press of Colorado 2008 Book Spring 2009 Vol. 13 No. 1
First Peoples In A New World: Colonizing Ice Age America David J. Meltzer



For the past 30 years, a debate has been raging among archaeologists and other scientists as to the discovery and colonization of the Western Hemisphere by Native Americans. In 1977,... University of California Press 2009 Book Summer 2009 Vol. 13 No. 1
The Great Basin: People and Places in Ancient Times Catherine S. Fowler
Don D. Fowler


The Great Basin and neighboring western Colorado Plateau occupy most of Nevada and Utah, as well as portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, and Colorado—an incredibly diverse region that remains... School for Advanced Research 2008 Book Summer 2009 Vol. 13 No. 2
Ancient Peoples of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau Steven R. Simms



The Great Basin and neighboring western Colorado Plateau occupy most of Nevada and Utah, as well as portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, and Colorado—an incredibly diverse region that remains... Left Coast Press 2008 Book Summer 2009 Vol. 13 No. 2
Speaking with the Ancestors: Mississippian Stone Statuary of the Tennessee-Cumberland Region Kevin E. Smith
James V. Miller


The stone statuary of the Mississippian cultures of the Southeast represents perhaps the most enigmatic artifacts of that region. Archaeologist Kevin Smith of Middle Tennessee University and the late James... University of Alabama Press 2009 Book Summer 2009 Vol. 13 No. 2
The Ancient Southwest: Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde David E. Stuart



In 1982, University of New Mexico archaeologist David Stuart began writing newspaper columns on Southwestern archaeology. Readers were quickly hooked. This delightful volume reprints many of these columns. It is... University of New Mexico Press 2009 Book Summer 2009 Vol. 13 No. 2
Chaco and After in the Northern San Juan: Excavations at the Bluff Great House Catherine M. Cameron



Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico was the center of a large and very complex culture that flourished in the 11th and 12th centuries before suddenly collapsing. Characterized by impressive... University of Arizona Press 2009 Book Fall 2009 Vol. 13 No. 3
Gold Rush Port: The Maritime Archaeology of San Francisco’s Waterfront James P. Delgado



Who would guess that underneath the Financial District in downtown San Francisco lays the remains of the original port complete with ships, wharves and buildings? Between 1849 and 1851, the... University of California Press 2009 Book Fall 2009 Vol. 13 No. 3
The Neighbors of Casas Grandes: Excavating Medio Period Communities of Northwest Chihuahua, Mexico Michael E. Whalen
Paul E. Minnis


After the collapse of Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, a complex culture flourished in and around Casas Grandes (or Paquimé) in northern Mexico, with its peak dating to about A.D.... University of Arizona Press 2009 Book Fall 2009 Vol. 13 No. 3
Remembering Awatovi: The Story of Archaeological Expedition in Northern Arizona 1935-1939 Hester A. Davis



Hester Davis writes: “When the food is good, the research interesting, and the weather fine, when the accommodations are adequate, the people compatible, and the diversions enjoyable, then living in... Peabody Museum Press 2008 Book Fall 2009 Vol. 13 No. 3
A History of the Ancient Southwest Stephen H. Lekson



Traditional archaeology in the American Southwest has produced many linear feet of scientific reports, hundreds of monographs, dozens of textbooks, but nothing to pull all this information together into a... School of Advanced Research Press 2009 Book Winter 2009-10 Vol. 13 No. 4
Gifts from the Ancestors: Ancient Ivories of Bering Strait William W. Fitzhugh
Julie Hollowell
Aron L. Crowell

Produced to accompany an exhibit by the same name at the Princeton University Art Museum (running through January 10, 2010), this volume is an outstanding collection of recent information about... Yale University Press 2009 Book Winter 2009-10 Vol. 13 No. 4
Life on the Rocks: One Woman’s Adventures in Petroglyph Preservation Katherine Wells



In 1992, a Southern California artist and her partner purchased 188 acres near Española in northern New Mexico on which to build a new home and a new life. The... University of New Mexico Press 2009 Book Winter 2009-10 Vol. 13 No. 4
Our Unprotected Heritage: Whitewashing the Destruction of our Cultural and Natural Environment Thomas F. King



In this compelling book, Tom King examines the state of cultural and natural preservation in the United States and finds it sorely lacking. Despite strong sounding laws like the National... Left Coast Press 2009 Book Winter 2009-10 Vol. 13 No. 4
The Search for Mabila Vernon James Knight, Jr.



From his 1539 landing in modern day Florida until his death somewhere along the Mississippi River almost three years later, the Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto wreaked havoc on every... University of Alabama Press 2009 Book Spring 2010 Vol. 14 No. 1
Pestilence and Persistence: Yosemite Indian Demography and Culture in Colonial California Kathleen L. Hull



One of the most important and contentious issues of American anthropology is the impact of the European encounter on Native American populations. In this important study of the Indians of... University of California Press 2009 Book Spring 2010 Vol. 14 No. 1
Spirits of Earth: The Effigy Mound Landscape of Madison and the Four Lakes Robert A. Birmingham



When white settlers flooded into Wisconsin in the 1830s, many were amazed by the numerous, huge earthen mounds they discovered. Shaped like mammals, birds, and mythical beings, these effigy mounds... University of Wisconsin Press 2010 Book Spring 2010 Vol. 14 No. 1
Mammoths and Mastodons: Titans of the Ice Age Cheryl Bardoe



This book was produced for young readers (age eight and up) by the Field Museum in Chicago to accompany a major new exhibit on these Ice Age giants. It tells... Abrams 2010 Book Spring 2010 Vol. 14 No. 1
Excavating Nauvoo: The Mormons and the Rise of Historical Archaeology Benjamin C. Pykles



Before Salt Lake City there was Nauvoo, Illinois, home to the fledgling Mormon Church from 1839 to 1846. Founder Joseph Smith selected the site on the east bank of the... University of Nebraska Press 2010 Book Summer 2010 Vol. 14 No. 1
The Year the Stars Fell: Lakota Winter Counts at the Smithsonian Candace S. Green
Russell Thornton


Winter counts are pictorial calendars, originally on buffalo hides, by which Plains Indians kept tract of their past. Each year was marked with a picture of a memorable event, and... University of Nebraska Press 2007 Book Winter 2007-08 Vol. 11 No. 4
Circular Villages of the Monongahela Tradition Bernard K. Means



Between A.D. 1000 and 1635, the Monongahela people dominated southwestern Pennsylvania and adjacent parts of Ohio and West Virginia. They lived in dwellings arranged around a central plaza and enclosed... University of Alabama Press Book Winter 2007-08 Vol. 11 No. 4
California Prehistory: Colonization, Culture, and Complexity Terry L. Jones
Kathryn A. Klar


California boasts one of the most diverse archaeologies in North America, and it is a daunting enterprise to try to get it into one volume. In 2003, the Society for... AltaMira Press 2007 Book Winter 2007-08 Vol. 11 No. 4
The Natchez Indians: A History to 1735 James F. Barnett, Jr.



In 1682, members of Rene-Robert Cavelier de La Salle’s French expedition were the first Europeans to encounter members of what would become one of the best historically documented Southeastern Indian... University Press of Mississippi 2007 Book Spring 2008 Vol. 11 No. 1
New Perspectives on Pottery Mound Pueblo Polly Schaafsma



Pottery Mound is an important Puebloan archaeological site located on the Rio Puerco in central New Mexico. It was occupied from about A.D. 1370 to 1475, but its pottery and... University of New Mexico Press 2007 Book Spring 2008 Vol. 12 No. 1
Saving Places That Matter: A Citizen’s Guide To the National Historic Preservation Act Thomas F. King



Passed in 1966, the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) is the nation’s premier statute protecting archaeological sites and other historic places and buildings. Limited in scope to mainly governmental actions,... Left Coast Press 2007 Book Spring 2008 Vol. 12 No. 1
Subfloor Pits and the Archaeology of Slavery in Colonial Virginia Patricia M. Samford



A common characteristic of Virginia slave quarters is the presence of subfloor pits. Commonly explained as root cellars or storage places for personal belongings, these pits may well have served... University of Alabama Press 2007 Book Spring 2008 Vol. 12 No. 1
The Chaco Experience: Landscape and Ideology in the Center Place Ruth M. Van Dyke



Since its rediscovery in the 19th century, archaeologists and others have struggled to make sense of this complex of 12 great apartment-like buildings and associated structures located in the San... School for Advanced Research Press 2007 Book Summer 2008 Vol. 12 No. 2
SunWatch: Fort Ancient Development in the Mississippian World Robert A. Cook



The Fort Ancient people were the last prehistoric culture to inhabit the Middle Ohio Valley (ca. A.D. 1000-1650). They were named after the Fort Ancient site that was in fact... University of Alabama Press 2008 Book Summer 2008 Vol. 12 No. 2
Florida’s People during the Last Ice Age Barbara A. Purdy



It’s hard to imagine the Ice Age in Florida, but even though the glaciers did not reach that far south, their impact was terrific. Since so much water was tied... University Press of Florida 2008 Book Summer 2008 Vol. 12 No. 2
Historic Native Peoples of Texas William C. Foster



When the Spanish arrived in present day Texas some 500 years ago there were several hundred Native tribes living in, hunting, or trading across today’s Texas. Using the accounts of... University of Texas Press 2008 Book Summer 2008 Vol. 12 No. 2
Pottery and Practice: The Expression of Identity at Pottery Mound and Hummingbird Pueblo Suzanne L. Eckert



Pottery and Practice is a case study that focuses on the pottery of two small, 14th-century pueblo villages in the Lower Rio Puerco area of New Mexico: Hummingbird Pueblo and... University of New Mexico Press 2008 Book Fall 2008 Vol. 12 No. 3
The Teotihuacån Trinity: The Sociopolitical Structure of an Ancient Mesoamerica City Annabeth Headrick



Located a few miles north of modern Mexico City, it awes visitors in its size and magnificence even after being in ruins for some 1300 years. Organized along the three-mile-long... University of Texas Press 2007 Book Fall 2008 Vol. 12 No. 3
Time’s River: Archaeological Syntheses from the Lower Mississippi River Valley Janet Rafferty
Evan Peacock


Mississippi State archaeologists Janet Rafferty and Evan Peacock have assembled this comprehensive overview of the prehistory of the Mississippi River Valley from southeastern Missouri to central Louisiana, the site of... University of Alabama Press 2008 Book Fall 2008 Vol. 12 No. 3
The Ramseys at Swan Pond: the Archaeology and History of an East Tennessee Farm Charles H. Faulkner



The stone Ramsey House was built in 1797 for Francis Alexander Ramsey, a prominent early settler of East Tennessee. In 1952, it was purchased by the Association for the Preservation... University of Tennessee Press 2008 Book Fall 2008 Vol. 12 No. 3
Moundville John H. Blitz



Moundville is the nation’s second largest prehistoric mound-builder site, sprawling over some 325 acres on the banks of the Black Warrior River in northwestern Alabama. It was occupied and used... University of Alabama Press 2008 Book Winter 2008-09 Vol. 12 No. 4
The Archaeology of Everyday Life at Early Moundville Gregory D. Wilson



Moundville is the nation’s second largest prehistoric mound-builder site, sprawling over some 325 acres on the banks of the Black Warrior River in northwestern Alabama. It was occupied and used... University of Alabama Press 2008 Book Winter 2008-09 Vol. 12 No. 4
Palenque: Eternal City of the Maya David Stuart
George Stuart


With its spectacular setting on the mountainous edge of the Chiapas coastal plain in southern Mexico, its remarkable art and architecture, and its dramatic history, Palenque is for many the... Thames & Hudson 2008 Book Winter 2008-09 Vol. 12 No. 4
American Indian Places Frances H. Kennedy



This book features an exciting collaboration between a great variety of experts—279 of them—who span several disciplines and hold a variety of world-views. Because it takes an open-ended approach to... Houghton Mifflin 2008 Winter 2008-09 Vol. 12 No. 4
War Paths, Peace Paths: An Archaeology of Cooperation and Conflict in Native Eastern North America David H. Dye



Archaeologist David Dye of the University of Memphis has produced the first comprehensive study of prehistoric war and peace in eastern North America. It is long overdue and fills a... AltaMira Press 2009 Book Spring 2009 Vol. 13 No. 1
The Chattahoochee Chiefdoms John H. Blitz
Karl G. Lorenz


Along the lower Chattahoochee River Valley between Columbus, Georgia and the Gulf of Mexico, a number of large villages with mounds developed between about A.D. 1100 and 1600. Native Americans... University of Alabama 2006 Book Fall 2006 Vol. 10 No. 3
Mountain Spirit: The Sheep Eater Indians of Yellowstone Lawrence L. Loendorf
Nancy Medaris Stone


This is the story of the Indian tribes that lived in the Yellowstone area for thousands of years. They were a Shoshone group called Tukudika, or Sheep Easters. Unlike the... University of Utah Press 2006 Book Fall 2006 Vol. 10 No. 3
Janaab’ Pakal of Palenque: Reconstructing the Life and Death of a Maya Ruler Edited by Vera Tiesler and Andrea Cucina Vera Tiesler
Andrea Cucina


In 1952, Mexican archaeologist Alberto Ruz Lhuillier opened the most elaborate ancient tomb ever discovered in the New World deep inside the Pyramid of the Inscriptions at the spectacular Maya... The University of Arizona Press 2006 Book Winter 2006-07 Vol. 10 No. 4
Tracking Ancient Footsteps: William D. Lipe’s Contributions to Southwestern Prehistory and Public Archaeology R.G. Matson
Timothy A. Kohler


In 1974, Washington State University archaeologist Bill Lipe published “A Conservation Model for American Archaeology” in Kiva, a small southwestern journal. It elegantly set forth a new foundation for the... Washington State University Press Book Winter 2006-07 Vol. 10 No. 4
The Water Mysteries of Mesa Verde Kenneth R. Wright



Water is the lifeblood of the American Southwest. It has shaped the region for millennia. The rise and fall of the Anasazi of Mesa Verde and the surrounding region may... Johnson Books 2006 Book Winter 2006-07 Vol. 10 No. 4
Huts and History: The Historical Archaeology of Military Encampment Clarence R. Geier
David G. Orr,
Matthew B. Reeves

Until now, archaeologists of the Civil War have concentrated their efforts on the battlefields. This volume is the first dedicated to the archaeology of Civil War encampments, where the soldiers... University Press of Florida 2006 Book Winter 2006-07 Vol. 10 No. 4
Jamestown, the Buried Truth William M. Kelso



Four hundred years ago, a small group of intrepid English adventurers landed on Jamestown Island in what is now Virginia, starting the first enduring English colony in the New World.... University of Virginia Press 2006 Book Spring 2007 Vol. 11 No. 1
Canyon Gardens: The Ancient Pueblo Landscapes of the American Southwest V.B. Price
Baker H. Morrow


In this provocative little volume the editors present a collection of essays on the ancient surroundings of the Southwestern pueblos that demonstrates their use of landscape design and horticulture as... University of New Mexico Press 2006 Book Spring 2007 Vol. 11 No. 1
A Conquering Spirit: Fort Mims and the Redstick War of 1813-1814 Gregory A. Waselkov



On August 30, 1813, 700 Redstick Creeks attacked the fortified plantation home of Samuel Mims on the southern frontier of the United States in what is now Alabama. Some 250... University of Alabama Press 2006 Book Spring 2007 Vol. 11 No. 1
Inconstant Companions: Archaeology and North American Indian Oral Traditions By Ronald J. Mason



In recent years it has become fashionable in some archaeological and Native American circles to embrace the thesis that oral traditions are as valid as scientific statements about the past,... University of Alabama Press 2006 Book Spring 2007 Vol. 11 No. 1
Olmec Archaeology and Early Mesoamerica Christopher H. Pool



In about 1400 B.C., an advanced and distinctive culture emerged in southern Mexico, probably in the lowland forests of the Gulf Coast. The Aztecs, who appeared 2,800 years later and... Cambridge University Press 2007 Book Summer 2007 Vol. 11 No. 2
Ancient Objects and Sacred Realms F. Kent Reilly
James E. Garber


For more than 60 years scholars have tried to make sense of the pre-Columbian artistic tradition of the Southeastern United States popularly known as the “Southern Cult.” During the 1990s,... University of Texas Press 2007 Book Summer 2007 Vol. 11 No. 2
Looting Spiro Mounds, An American King Tut’s Tomb David La Vere



Spiro Mounds on the Arkansas River in eastern Oklahoma is, or was, one of the most impressive Mississippian mound complexes in the nation. At least 11 mounds surround a great... University of Oklahoma Press 2007 Book Summer 2007 Vol. 11 No. 2
Historical Archaeology: Why the Past Matters Barbara J. Little



Of rather recent vintage in the United States, historical archaeology is a rapidly growing discipline that has achieved some spectacular successes. Historical archaeologists study documents, but they also study material... Left Coast Press 2007 Book Summer 2007 Vol. 11 No. 2
John Smith’s Chesapeake Voyages, 1607-1609 Helen C. Roundtree
Wayne E. Clark
Kent Mountford

As we celebrate the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown, the first successful English colony in America, another important book on the subject has appeared. Captain John Smith is... University of Virginia Press 2007 Book Fall 2007 Vol. 11 No. 3
Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao Cameron L. McNeil



For modern Americans, chocolate is a staple of drink and dessert, of snacks and elaborate culinary delights. Chocolate is made from the seeds of the cacao tree, native to the... University Press of Florida 2006 Book Fall 2007 Vol. 11 No. 3
The Chocolate Tree: A Natural History of Cacao Allen M Young



For modern Americans, chocolate is a staple of drink and dessert, of snacks and elaborate culinary delights. Chocolate is made from the seeds of the cacao tree, native to the... University Press of Florida 2007 Book Fall 2007 Vol. 11 No. 3
Archaeology in Washington Ruth Kirk
Richard D. Daugherty


With its rich and varied ecosystems, it is no wonder that Washington State has some of the most interesting archaeology in the country. From costal early human sites to semi-desert... University of Washington Press, 2007 Book Fall 2007 Vol. 11 No. 3
Fort St. George: Archaeological Investigation of the 1607-1608 Popham Colony Jeffrey P. Brain



Jamestown wasn’t the only American colony founded by the British is 1607. At the mouth of the Kennebec River in Maine another intrepid group of adventurers founded a colony in... Maine State Museum 2007 Book Fall 2007-08 Vol. 11 No. 3
The Architecture of Chaco Canyon Stephen H. Lekson



In the 11th century when everyone else in the Southwest was building small, crude structures, Puebloans in Chaco Canyon constructed magnificent, well-planned, five-story buildings using masonry instead of earth and... University of Utah Press 2007 Book Winter 2007-08 Vol. 11 No. 4
From a Watery Grave: The Discovery and Excavation of La Salle’s Shipwreck, La Belle James E. Bruseth
Toni S. Turner


In June 1995, scientists from the Texas Historical Commission discovered the wreck of La Belle in Matagora Bay near Port O’Connor. It had been the flagship of La Salle’s expedition... Texas A&M University Press 2005 Book Summer 2005 Vol. 9 No. 2
The Calusa and Their Legacy: South Florida People and Their Environments Darcie A. MacMahon
William H. Marquardt


The Calusa of southwestern Florida were the last Florida group to succumb to European colonization, resisting the Spanish invaders for some 150 years. But by the mid-1700s they had disappeared.... University Press of Florida 2004 Book Summer 2005 Vol. 9 No. 2
In Search of Maya Sea Traders Heather McKillop



In 1502 on his fourth and final voyage to the New World, Christopher Columbus encountered a huge cargo canoe off the southeastern coast of the Yucatán. It was loaded down... Texas A&M University Press 2005 Book Fall 2005 Vol. 9 No. 3
Boomtown Saloons: Archaeology and History in Virginia City Kelly J. Dixon



In the last half of the 19th century, Virginia City, Nevada was overrun with some 200,000 diverse people who came in search of the vast deposits of gold and silver... University of Nevada Press 2005 Book Fall 2005 Vol. 9 No. 3
Gifts of the Great River: Arkansas Effigy Pottery from the Edwin Curtiss Collection John H. House



The St. Francis River of northeastern Arkansas meanders slowly between the great Mississippi River on the east and Crowley’s Ridge to the west. Part of the Mississippi Delta, it was... Peabody Museum Press 2005 Book Fall 2005 Vol. 9 No. 3
Native American Voices of Identity, Art, & Culture: Objects of Everlasting Esteem Lucy Fowler Williams
William Wierzbowski,
Robert W. Preucel

In the foreword to this highly original volume, Richard Leventhal, the director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, explains that the museum is not just a... University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology 2005 Book Fall 2005 Vol. 9 No. 3
1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus Charles C. Mann



In the last several decades, archaeologists and others have made very significant strides in understanding what the Western Hemisphere looked like when Columbus stepped ashore. It is a very different... Alfred A. Knopf 2005 Book Winter 2005-06 Vol. 9 No. 4
Chaco Canyon: Archaeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society Brian Fagan



Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico is home to some of the most complex ruins in the United States. At a time (ca. A.D. 950) when everyone else in the... Oxford University Press 2005 Book Winter 2005-06 Vol. 9 No. 4
Archaeology at Shiloh Indian Mounds, 1899-1999 Paul D. Welch



The bloody Civil War battle of Shiloh of 1862 took place on and around a major archaeological site on the bluff overlooking the Tennessee River. Dating between A.D. 1000 and... University of Alabama Press 2006 Book Winter 2005-06 Vol. 9 No. 4
Introduction to Rock Art Research David S. Whitley



Once dismissed by archaeologists, rock art research is today attracting scholars and avocationalists from many disciplines who see it as an important tool for understanding the spiritual context of ancient... Left Coast Press 2005 Book Winter 2005-06 Vol. 9 No. 4
Lords of Creation: The Origins of Sacred Maya Kingship Virginia M. Fields
Dorie Reents-Budet


Published to accompany a traveling exhibition organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art that will be displayed at the Dallas Museum of Art (February 2006) and the New... Los Angeles County Museum of Art with Scala 2005 Book Spring 2006 Vol. 10 No. 1
Byron Cummings: Dean of Southwest Archaeology Todd W. Bostwick



In 1893, a New York born and Rutgers educated classics scholar turned his back on his eastern roots and accepted a position at the University of Utah teaching Latin and... University of Arizona Press 2006 Book Spring 2006 Vol. 10 No. 1
Mississippi Archaeology Q & A Evan Peacock



For 20 odd years Evan Peacock of Mississippi State University has been answering questions about the archaeology of his state. Now he has turned this information into a delightful little... University Press of Mississippi 2005 Book Spring 2006 Vol. 10 No. 1
The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship J.R. Whitesel
Joseph W. Zarzynski


As we celebrate the 250th anniversary of the French and Indian War in North America, an important new film has been released about this global conflict between France and Britain.... Pepe Productions 2005 DVD Spring 2006 Vol. 10 No. 1
Folsom: New Archaeological Investigations of a Classic Paleoindian Bison Kill David J. Meltzer



In the first decade of the 20th century an African-American cowboy discovered large, deeply buried bones eroding from a bank of Wild Horse Arroyo in the northeast corner of New... University of California Press 2006 Book Summer 2006 Vol. 10 No. 2
The Mesa Verde World David Grant Noble



As the nation celebrates the 100th anniversary of the creation of Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado, archaeological interpreter David Grant Noble has produced an important new work on... School of America Research Press 2006 Book Summer 2006 Vol. 10 No. 2
People of the Shoals: Stallings Culture of the Savannah River Valley Kenneth E. Sassaman



Some 5,000 years ago groups of hunter-gatherers abandoned their nomadic lifestyle for a more settled way of life in the middle part of the Savannah River Valley in Georgia and... University Press of Florida 2006 Book Summer 2006 Vol. 10 No. 2
Aztalan: Mysteries of an Ancient Indian Town Robert A. Birmingham
Lynne G. Goldstein


Fifty miles west of Milwaukee stands the ruins of Aztalan, a large town with mounds that seemed far more characteristic of the lower Mississippi River Valley. The early Europeans settlers... Wisconsin Historical Society Press 2006 Book Summer 2006 Vol. 10 No. 2
The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital: Excavations in Annapolis Mark P. Leone



In the United States historical archaeology, that is, archaeology that draws both on material remains of past cultures and the contemporary written records, is a relatively new field of study.... University of California Press 2005 Book Fall 2006 Vol. 10 No. 3
The Antiquities Act: A Century of American Archaeology, Historic Preservation, and Nature Conservation David Harmon
Francis P. McManamon
Dwight T. Pitcaithley

One hundred years ago on June 8, 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt signed into law “An act for the preservation of American antiquities.” Consisting of only four short paragraphs, it fit... University Press of Arizona 2006 Book Fall 2006 Vol. 10 No. 3
Journeys with Florida’s Indians Kelley G. Weitzel



Combining fact with fiction, Kelley Weitsel has produced a notable addition to children’s literature (grades four through eight) on Native American history. She covers the Indians of Florida from their... University Press of Florida 2002 Book Spring 2004 Vol. 8 No. 1
The Moundbuilders: Ancient Peoples of Eastern North America George R. Milner



By a happy coincidence two volumes on the ancient mound builders of eastern North America have appeared at the same time. George Milner’s is new, lavishly illustrated, and contains all... Thames & Hudson 2004 Book Summer 2004 Vol. 8 No. 2
The Mound-Builders Henry Clyde Shetrone
Bradley T. Lepper


By a happy coincidence two volumes on the ancient mound builders of eastern North America have appeared at the same time. George Milner’s is new, lavishly illustrated, and contains all... University of Alabama Press 2004 Book Summer 2004 Vol. 8 No. 2
Storied Stone: Indian Rock Art of the Black Hills Country Linea Sundstrom



Rock art expert Linea Sundstrom has contributed an important addition to the growing collection of serious works on American Indian rock art. A native of the Black Hills, Sundstrom drew... University of Oklahoma Press 2004 Book Summer 2004 Vol. 8 No. 2
The Archaeologist’s Toolkit Larry J. Zimmerman
William Green


Archaeologists Larry Zimmerman of the Minnesota Historical Society and William Green of Beloit College have assembled a valuable teaching tool kit. The seven volumes are designed to teach novice archaeologists... AltaMira Press 2003 Book Summer 2004 Vol. 8 No. 2
Ancient Mexico & Central America: Archaeology and Culture History Susan Toby Evans



In Ancient Mexico & Central America, Susan Toby Evans has produced a monumental survey of the prehistoric cultures of Mesoamerica, the region between north-central Mexico and Costa Rica. The Olmec,... Thames & Hudson 2004 Book Fall 2004 Vol. 8 No. 3
Early Art of the Southeastern Indians: Feathered Serpents & Winged Beings Susan C. Power


fbandelier
The prehistoric people of the Southeastern United States produced some of the richest and most sophisticated Native art. Cultures we know as Mississippian, Caddo, Hopewell, Adena, and Poverty Point thrived... University of Georgia Press 2004 Book Fall 2004 Vol. 8 No. 3
The Seminole Wars: America’s Longest Indian Conflict John Missall
Mary Lou Missall


Three Seminole wars in Florida lasted from 1817 to 1858, the longest, bloodiest, and most costly of all the Indian wars fought in the United States. They were of major... University Press of Florida 2004 Book Fall 2004 Vol. 8 No. 3
Shovel Bum: Comix of Archaeological Field Life Trent de Boer



Half the “fun” of being an archaeologist in America is the experience of fieldwork. Shovel bums endure weeks of flea-bitten motel beds, greasy roadhouse food, temperamental vehicles, and long stretches... AltaMira Press 2004 Book Fall 2004 Vol. 8 No. 3
Artifact: The Hunt for Stolen Treasurers



Bored with Trivial Pursuit and Clue? Artifact is an entertaining strategy game that sends players around the world to recover missing treasures. You are in charge of Interpol’s Artifact Recovery... Outset Media 2004 Board game Fall 2004 vl 8 No. 3
Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand: American Indian Art of the Ancient Midwest and South Richard F. Townsend



The editor of this stunning large-format book has assembled an impressive collection of 19 essays that cover the whole array of Native American art and archaeology in the Midwestern and... Art Institute of Chicago 2004 Book Winter 2004-05 Vol. 8 No. 4
In Search of Chaco: New Approaches to an Archaeological Enigma David Grant Noble



Since their modern rediscovery some 155 years ago, the puebloan ruins in Chaco Canyon have amazed, bemused, and bewildered laymen and archaeologists alike. Located in a remote, desert canyon in... School of American Research Press 2004 Book Winter 2004-05 Vol. 8 No. 4
Troweling Through Time: The First Century of Mesa Verdean Archaeology Florence C. Lister



No place is more symbolic of American archaeology that the spectacular ruins of Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado. Much of Southwestern archaeology got its start there and in... University of New Mexico Press 2004 Book Winter 2004-05 Vol. 8 No. 4
The Olmecs: America’s First Civilization Richard A. Diehl



Beginning about 1500 B.C. a people emerged from the watery lowlands of the Gulf Coast of Mexico and established the first cities in the Americas. Famous for their colossal stone... Thames & Hudson 2004 Book Winter 2004-05 Vol. 8 No. 4
Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed Jared Diamond



The rise and fall of cultures and civilizations is a central theme of archaeology throughout the world. Collapse is the sequel to Jared Diamond’s best-selling and Pulitzer Prize- winning Guns,... Viking 2005 Book Spring 2005 Vol. 9 No. 1
The Ohio Hopewell Episode: Paradigm Lost, Paradigm Gained A. Martin Byers



When Europeans first entered the Ohio Valley, they discovered numerous large earthen structures—mounds (often containing burials), timber constructions that were ritually destroyed and covered with earth, and embankment earthworks usually... University of Akron Press 2004 Book Spring 2005 Vol. 9 No. 1
Hopi Oral Tradition and the Archaeology of Identity Wesley Bernardini



The 14th century A.D. was perhaps the most dynamic of any for the Puebloan people of the American Southwest. In 1300, the Four Corners area had been abandoned and Puebloan... University of Arizona Press 2005 Book Spring 2005 Vol. 9 No. 1
Touring Gotham’s Archaeological Past: 8 Self-Guided Walking Tours through New York City Diana diZerega Wall
Anne-Marie Cantwell


Humans have lived in America’s biggest city for at least 11,000 years—Native Americans, Dutch settlers, African slaves, and people from most every country in the world. They all left their... Yale University Press 2004 Book Spring 2005 Vol. 9 No. 1
The Peopling of Bandelier: New Insights from the Archaeology of the Pajarito Plateau Robert P. Powers



Next to Mesa Verde, Bandelier National Monument in northern New Mexico is the most visited archaeological park in America. Yet precious little is known about the ancestral Puebloan people who... School of American Research Press 2005 Book Summer 2005 Vol. 9 No. 2
Ohio Archaeology: An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio’s Ancient American Indian Cultures Bradley T. Lepper



In the 19th century, Ohio was the center of archaeological research in America. Its rich diversity and enigmatic mounds and earthworks attracted scholars from near and far. The first archaeological... Orange Frazer Press 2005 Book Summer 2005 Vol. 9 No. 2
Rock Art of the Lower Pecos Carolyn E. Boyd



Archaeologist-artist Carolyn Boyd has prepared this dazzling study of some of the Southwest’s most dramatic and little seen rock art. In the harsh environment of southwestern Texas and northern Mexico,... Texas A&M University Press 2003 Book Spring 2004 Vol. 8 No. 1
How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs John Montgomery



If you want to read ancient Maya writing, these two guides are essential. The first volume explains the basics of epigraphy, the study of ancient languages, and how this science... Hippocrene Books 2002 Book Spring 2003 Vol. 7 No. 1
Aztecs Eduardo Matos Moctezuma
Felipe Solis Olguin


Prepared to accompany one of the greatest exhibitions of Aztec culture ever assembled at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Aztecs documents in glorious color one of the world’s... Royal Academy of Arts/Abrams 2003 Book Summer 2003 Vol. 7 No. 2
Talking Birds, Plumed Serpents, and Painted Women: The Ceramics of Casas Grandes Joanne Stuhr



Casas Grandes (or Paquimé) is a stunning adobe site in the Chihuahuan desert of northern Mexico that flourished from about A.D.1200 to 1450, reaching its zenith after the fall of... University of Arizona Press 2002 Book Summer 2003 Vol. 7 No. 2
Before California: An Archaeologist Looks at Our Earliest Inhabitants Brian Fagen



Famed archaeologist Brian Fagen has produced a captivating and readable account of the first 12,000 years of California history. A professor of anthropology at the University of California at Santa... AltaMira Press, 2003 Book Summer 2003 Vol. 7 No. 2
Etowah: The Political History of a Chiefdom Capital Adam King



A hundred years of excavations have produced a wealth of artifacts from Etowah, one of the largest and most important mound centers in the Southeast. Marble statues, copper embossed plates,... University of Alabama Press 2003 Book Summer 2003 Vol. 7 No. 2
Archaeology the Comic Johannes H.N. Loubser



Follow young Squizee as she discovers the inner workings of archaeology after her family’s farm is looted. She learns from professional archaeologists how to survey, excavate, analyze, interpret, and preserve... AltaMira Press 2003 Book Summer 2003 Vol. 7 No. 3
The Archaeologist was a Spy: Sylvanus G. Morley and the Office of Naval Intelligence Charles H. Harris III
Louis R. Sadler


As the United States entered World War I in 1917, the Office of Naval Intelligence was obsessed with the notion that the Germans had (or would) establish U-boat bases in... University of New Mexico Press 2003 Book Fall 2003 Vol. 7 No. 3
Lost World: Rewriting Prehistory—How New Science is Tracing America’s Ice Age Mariners Tom Koppel



Canadian journalist Tom Koppel tells the story of the archaeologists and other scientists who are using new technologies to search for the first Americans along the North Pacific rim from... Atria Books 2003 Book Fall 2003 Vol. 7 No. 3
Twelve Millennia: Archaeology of the Upper Midwest River Valley James L. Theler
Robert F. Boszhardt


This is the story of one of America’s richest archaeological locales in the beautiful Mississippi River Valley from Rock Island, Illinois to Minneapolis. Authors Theler and Boszhardt of the Mississippi... University of Iowa Press 2003 Book Fall 2003 Vol. 7 No. 3
The Native Americans of the Texas Edwards Plateau, 1582-1799 Maria F. Wade



The region that now includes Central Texas was once inhabited by numerous Native American tribes that we are only now learning about through archaeological discovery and Spanish and French Colonial... University of Texas Press 2003 Book Fall 2003 Vol. 7 No. 3
Archaeologies of the Pueblo Revolt: Identity, Meaning, and Renewal in the Pueblo World Robert W. Preucel



The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 in New Mexico was the only successful native uprising against European colonial rule in the present United States and historians have long regarded it as... University of New Mexico Press 2002 Book Fall 2003 Vol. 7 No. 3
Colonial Encounters in a Native American Landscape: The Spanish and Dutch in North America Nan A, Rothschild



This is the study of two distinct colonial experiences that happened in 17th- century North America, but 2,000 miles apart—the Dutch in New York and the Spanish in New Mexico.... Smithsonian Books 2003 Book Winter 2003-04 Vol. 7 No. 4
One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West before Lewis and Clark Colin G. Calloway



Colin Calloway has produced a magnificent, sweeping history of the Native people of the American West from their arrival some 12,000 years or more ago to the European-American arrival in... University of Nebraska Press 2003 Book Winter 2003-04 Vol. 7 No. 4
On the Trail of the Maya Explorer: Tracing the Epic Journey of John Lloyd Stephens Steve Glassman



For those of us who love the adventure of travel to remote and wondrous areas of the world, there is no better travel book than John Lloyd Stephens’ Incidents of... University of Alabama Press 2003 Book Winter 2003-04 Vol. 7 No. 4
Indians of South Florida: 1513-1763 John H. Hann



Historian John Hann has produced the first survey of Florida’s natives who lived south of a line roughly through Orlando that includes some of the richest cultural history in the... University Press of Florida 2003 Book Winter 2003-04 Vol. 7 No. 4
Stories On Stone Jennifer Owings Dewey



Noted children’s author and illustrator Jennifer Dewey introduces young people (ages seven and up) to the fabulous rock art of the American Southwest. Drawing on her personal experiences as a... University of New Mexico Press 2003 Book Winter 2003-04 Vol. 7 No. 4
Iroquoia: The Development of a Native World William Engelbrecht



Perhaps no group of Eastern Native Americans is better known to the general public than the Iroquois of upstate New York. A confederation of five tribes or nations—Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga,... Syracuse University Press 2003 Book Spring 2004 Vol. 8 No. 1
Three Sixteenth-Century Mohawk Iroquois Village Sites Robert E. Funk
Robert D. Kuhn


Perhaps no group of Eastern Native Americans is better known to the general public than the Iroquois of upstate New York. A confederation of five tribes or nations—Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga,... New York State Education Department 2003 Book Spring 2004 Vol. 8 No. 1
Miskwabik: Metal of Ritual Amelia M. Trevelyam



While prehistoric Native Americans were technically Stone Age people they also used metals. The most often used metal was copper, known as Miskwabik in the Ojibwe language. Copper was discovered... University Press of Kentucky 2004 Book Spring 2004 Vol. 8 No. 1
Archaeological Perspectives on the American Civil War Stephen R. Potter
Clarence R. Geier


Archaeology has finally taken up the American Civil War, and in a big way. Studies of the physical evidence of the war brings new information and new insights to perhaps... University Press of Florida 2001 Book Winter 2001-02 Vol. 5
Ruins and Rivals: The Making of Southwest Archaeology by James E. Snead



As the 19th century came to a close, Victorian America found a new fascination with the West, and in particular the ancient ruins of the Southwest and the native peoples... University of Arizona Press 2001 Book Winter 2001-02 Vol. 5 No. 4
An Archaeological Guide to Central & Southern Mexico by Joyce Kelly



Joyce Kelly has produced the third of her indispensable guides to Mesoamerican archaeological sites. This one covers the area from Zacatecas to the Yucatán, including the Valley of Mexico, Oaxaca,... University of Oklahoma Press 2001 Book Spring 2002 Vol. 6 No 1
The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican Ballgame E. Michael Whittington



The Mint Museum of Art in Charlotte, North Carolina has assembled the most comprehensive exhibit of materials ever displayed about the Mesoamerican ballgame. This superbly illustrated volume was produced to... Thames & Hudson 2001 Book Spring 2002 Vol. 6 No. 1
Excavations at Wickliffe Mounds Kit W. Wesler



In this fascinating volume, Kit Wesler tells the story of seven decades of excavations at the Wickliffe Mounds, a major Mississippian town near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi... University of Alabama Press 2001 Book Spring 2002 Vol. 6 No. 1
The Fall of the Ancient Maya David Webster



The Classic Maya collapse is one of the great mysteries of archaeology. For more than a thousand years the Maya developed an advanced culture in the rain forests of Central... Thames & Hudson 2002 Book Summer 2002 Vol. 6 No. 2
Plains Indian Rock Art James D. Keyser
Michael A. Klassen


Archaeologists James Keyser and Michael Klassen have produced an outstanding study of the rock art of the northern Great Plains from Colorado to Alberta. This is the land of the... University of Washington Press, 2001 Book Summer 2002 Vol. 6 No. 2
Cultural Resources Archaeology Thomas W. Neumann
Robert M. Sanford


Most American archaeologists today work in cultural resource management (CRM) rather than pure research. The authors have produced the first guide to the process of identification, evaluation, excavation, and reporting... AltaMira 2001 Book Summer 2002 Vol. 6 No. 2
Before and After Jamestown: Virginia’s Powhatans and their Predecessors Helen C. Roundtree
E. Randolph Turner III


Virginia ethnologist Helen Roundtree and archaeologist Randy Turner have joined forces to create the first comprehensive overview of the Powhatans—the people who met Captain John Smith at Jamestown in 1607... University Press of Florida 2002 Book Fall 2002 Vol. 6 No. 3
Homol’ovi: An Ancient Hopi Settlement Cluster E. Charles Adams



Archaeologist Charles Adams has conducted 15 years of research at Homol’ovi, a cluster of five Hopi villages and related sites on the Little Colorado River near Winslow, Arizona, some 60... University of Arizona Press 2002 Book Fall 2002 Vol. 6 No. 3
The First Americans: In Pursuit of Archaeology’s Greatest Mystery J.M. Adovasio
Jake Page


In the summer of 1973, University of Pittsburgh archaeologist James Adovasio began to excavate a nearby rock shelter. By the next summer, he had dug a hole 10 feet deep... Random House 2002 Book Winter 2002-03 Vol. 6 No. 4
Submerged: Adventures of America’s Most Elite Underwater Archaeology Team Daniel Lenihan



Submerged is more a tale of adventure than archaeology. Retired National Park Service underwater archaeologist Dan Lenihan relates the exciting and dangerous work of the nation’s first underwater archaeology team.... Newmarket Press 2002 Book Winter 2002-03 Vol. 6 No. 4
Archaeology of the Everglades John W. Griffin



While much has been written about the natural history of Florida’s Everglades, this is the first comprehensive study of its human history. It was originally prepared as a report for... University Press of Florida 2002 Book Winter 2002-03 Vol. 6 No. 4
Landscape of the Spirit: Hohokam Rock Art at South Mountain Park Todd W. Bostwick



South Mountain Park is the jewel of the Phoenix park system, easily accessible to millions of people. It contains an amazing concentration of ancient rock art, largely associated with the... University of Arizona Press 2002 Book Winter 2002-03 Vol. 6 No. 4
Ancient Visions: Petroglyphs and Pictographs of the Wind River and Bighorn Country, Wyoming and Montana Julie E. Francis
Lawrence L. Loendorf


For more than 11,000 years, Native Americans have made their homes in the Wind River and Bighorn basins of Wyoming and Montana, and they have produced one of the most... University Press of Utah 2002 Book Winter 2002-03 Vol. 6 No. 4
Stone Chisel and Yucca Brush: Colorado Plateau Rock Art Ekkehart Malotki
Donald E. Weaver, Jr.


In the past decade there has been a phenomenal growth of interest in the rock art of North America and the world. The Colorado Plateau of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and... Kiva Publishing 2002 Book Spring 2003 Vol. 7 No. 1
Columbus’s Outpost Among the Taínos: Spain and American at La Isabela 1493-1498 Kathleen Deagan
José María Cruxent


In 1493, on his second voyage to the New World, Christopher Columbus founded a royal trading colony on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. Equipped with 17 ships and 1,200 to... Yale University Press 2002 Book Spring 2003 Vol. 7 No. 1
The Archaeology and History of the Native Georigia Tribes Max E. White



Max E. White of Piedmont College has produced a concise history of Native Americans in Georgia from their origins some 12,000 years ago to the present. Georgia is a rich... University Press of Florida 2002 Book Spring 2003 Vol. 7 No. 1
Dictionary of Maya Hieroglyphs John Montgomery



If you want to read ancient Maya writing, these two guides are essential. The first volume explains the basics of epigraphy, the study of ancient languages, and how this science... Hippocrene Books 2002 Book Spring 2003 Vol. 7 No. 1
Time Before History: The Archaeology of North Carolina H. Trawick Ward
R.P. Stephen Davis Jr.


Time Before History is the first comprehensive survey of the Native American cultures that inhabited North Carolina through the arrival of the first Europeans. Probably because of its diverse topography,... University of North Carolina Press 1999 Book Spring 2000 Vol. 4 No. 1
Skull Wars: Kennewick Man, Archaeology and the Battle for Native American Identity David Hurst Thomas



With the passage in 1990 of the poorly crafted Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, Congress unwittingly unleashed the latest chapter in the struggle between American Indians and their... Basic Books 2000 Book Summer 2000 Vol. 4 No. 2
Anasazi America: Seventeen Centuries on the Road from Center Place, David E. Stewart



In a very readable narrative,University of New Mexico archaeologist David E. Stuart tells the 1,700-year story of the pueblo people of the Four Corners’ states. They have maintained a vibrant... University of New Mexico Press 2000 Book Summer 2000 Vol. 4 No. 2
Ancient Ruins of the Southwest David Grant Noble



For 20 years, this title has been the authoritative guide to all the accessible archaeological sites in the Southwest. The new edition is completely revised with 13 new sites, new... Northland 2000 Book Summer 2000 Vol. 4 No. 2
The Vikings and America Eric Wahlgren



It is always a pleasure to read a book by an author who is so enthralled with his subject that the entertainment value is nearly as great as the educational... Thames and Hudson 1986 Book Fall 2000 Vol. 4 No. 3
From Mounds to Mammoths: A Field Guide to Oklahoma Prehistory, 2nd edition Claudette Gilbert
Robert L. Brooks


The authors have produced a handy guide to 30,000(?) years of Oklahoma prehistory from the first American mammoth hunters to the farmers and buffalo hunters of contact times. It ends... University of Oklahoma Press 2000 Book Fall 2000 Vol. 4 No. 3
Indians of the Greater Southeast Bonnie G. McEwan



If you have ever wondered about the Indian tribes who lived in the American Southeast at the time of the European settlement (1500 to 1840) this book is for you.... University Press of Florida 2000 Book Fall 2000 Vol. 4 No. 3
The Art of the Shaman: Rock Art of California David S. Whitley



Three recently published books on prehistoric rock art in the American Southwest represent a range of current research into various aspects of this intriguing subject. Each book makes an important... University of Utah Press 2000 Book Winter 2000-01 Vol. 4 No. 4
Warrior, Shield, and Star: Imagery and Ideology of Pueblo Warfare Polly Schaafsma



Three recently published books on prehistoric rock art in the American Southwest represent a range of current research into various aspects of this intriguing subject. Each book makes an important... Western Edge Press 2000 Book Winter 2000-01 Vol. 4 No. 4
The Serpent and the Sacred Fire Dennis Slifer



Three recently published books on prehistoric rock art in the American Southwest represent a range of current research into various aspects of this intriguing subject. Each book makes an important... Museum of New Mexico Press 2000 Book Winter 2000-01 Vol. 4 No. 4
Chronicle of the Maya Kings and Queens Simon Martin
Nikolai Grube


Using the latest in Mayan hieroglyphic decipherment, the authors have assembled biographical accounts of some 152 kings and 4 ruling queens from 11 of the greatest Classical sites of the... Thames & Hudson 2000 Book Spring 2001 Vol. 5 No. 1
The Settlement of the Americas Thomas D. Dillehay



Just when we thought the problem of the peopling of the Americas was solved, along came Tom Dillehay. It was thought that the first Americans crossed the Bering Strait from... Basic Books 2000 Book Spring 2001 Vol. 5 No. 1
Cahokia: The Great Native American Metropoli Bilione Whiting Young
Melvin L. Fowler


Noted archaeologist Melvin L. Fowler has teamed up with writer Bilione Whiting Young to give us the first major popular account of Cahokia, the largest and most complex pre-Columbian city... University of Illinois Press 2000 Book Spring 2001 Vol. 5 No. 1
Native American Weapons Colin F. Taylor



In this engaging volume, Colin Taylor describes weaponry made and used by Native Americans from prehistoric through historic times, when European technology caused drastic changes. He also tells of defensive... University of Oklahoma Press 2001 Book Summer 2001 Vol. 5 No. 2
Riddle of the Bones: Politics, Science, Race, and the Story of Kennewick Man Roger Downey



Since its discovery along a bank of the Columbia River in Kennewick, Washing- ton, the ancient skeleton called Kennewick Man has ignited a raging political controversy that dwarfs the scientific... Copernicus/Springer-Verlang 2000 Book Summer 2001 Vol. 5 No. 2
The Ancient Mounds of Poverty Point Jon L. Gibson



One of America’s most intriguing prehistoric monuments sits on a small ridge overlooking Bayou Maçon in north- eastern Louisiana. Consisting of a series of concentric earthen half-rings and several large... University Press of Florida 2000 Book Summer 2001 Vol. 5 No. 2
Ancient Encounters: Kennewick Man and the First Americans James C. Chatters



Forensic anthropologist James Chatters tells his story of the discovery and examination of the famous skeleton found at Kennewick, Washington, on the banks of the Columbia River in 1996. After... Simon & Schuster 2001 Book Fall 2001 Vol. 5 No. 3
Casa Grandes and Its Hinterland Michael E. Whalen
Paul E. Minnis


One hundred thirty miles south of the United States border, in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, lie the ruins of the impressive prehistoric town of Casas Grandes (Great Houses) or... University of Arizona Press 2001 Book Fall 2001 Vol. 5 No. 3
Ancient Pioneers: The First Americans by George E. Stuart



If you’re looking for a readable, general introduction to American archaeology that is beautifully illustrated by the renowned photographers and illustrators of National Geographic, this is it. George Stuart, longtime... National Geographic Society 2001 Book Fall 2001 Vol. 5 No. 3
Tikal: An Illustrated History of the Ancient Maya Capital by John Montgomery



Art historian John Montgomery has produced a very readable history of the great Maya city of Tikal in the Petán rainforest of Guatemala. Drawing on the published sources, he has... Hippocrene Book 2001 Book Winter 2001-02 Vol. 5
Florida’s Indians from Ancient Times to the Present Jerald T. Milanich



Florida’s Indians tells the story of the native societies that have lived in Florida for 12,000 years- from the earliest hunters to the modern Seminole, Miccosukee, and Creeks. Written for... University Press of Florida 1998 Book Fall 1998 Vol. 2 No. 3
Archaeology of the Southwest Linda Cordell



In a follow-up to her 1984 book, Prehistory of the Southwest, Linda Cordell of the University Museum in Boulder, Colorado, presents a thorough synthesis of research, past and present, on... Academic Press 1997 Book Fall 1998 Vol. 2 No. 3
101 Questions About Ancient Indians of the Southwest David Grant Noble



Too often the cultural heritage of the American Southwest is lost on children living in the region, or those visiting it with their families, because publications and park interpretive exhibits... Southwest Parks and Monuments Association 1998 Book Fall 1998 Vol. 2 No. 3
When Horses Walked on Water: Horse Powered Ferries in Nineteenth-Century America Kevin J. Crisman
Arthur B. Cohn


Before the construction of America’s vast highways and railroads, water was perhaps the most formidable obstacle in the march of Manifest Destiny. Horses had long been used worldwide for drawing... Smithsonian Institution Press 1998 Book Winter 1998-99 Vol. 2 No. 4
The Mythology of Native North America David Leeming
Jake Page


The authors of this reader-friendly book on Native American myths organize all of them into three broad categories-pantheons, cosmos, and heroes and heroines. Although they recognize the distinctions among various... university of Oklahoma Press Book Winter 1998-99 Vol. 2 No. 4
Ancient West Mexico: Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past Richard F. Townsend



Produced to accompany a major exhibition of pre-Columbian objects from West Mexico, long considered a backwater on the periphery of the great civilizations of Mesoamerica, this richly illustrated volume documents... Thames and Hudson 1998 Book Winter 1998-99 Vol. 2 No. 4
Archaeology of Prehistoric Native America: An Encyclopedia Guy Gibbon



From Adena to Zuni, the more than 800 entries in this weighty reference cover prehistoric cultures, sites, artifact types, and more. An introductory reader’s guide outlines ancient North America and... Garland Publishing 1998 Book Spring 1999 Vol. 3 No. 1
Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley Ephraim G. Squier
Edwin H. Davis


On the 150th anniversary of the publication of its first scientific work, the Smithsonian Institution has reissued this classic volume on the mound builders of ancient America—a book many consider... Smithsonian Institution Press 1998 Book Spring 1999 Vol. 3 No. 1
Man Corn: Cannibalism and Violence in the Prehistoric American Southwest Christy G. Turner
Jacqueline Turner


For nearly 30 years, University of Arizona physical anthropologist Christy Turner and his late wife, Jacqueline, studied human bones from the Anasazi culture in the Four Corners—sites including Chaco Canyon,... University of Utah Press 1999 Book Spring 1999 Vol. 3 No. 1
The Cherokees and Their Chiefs Stanley Hoig



The Cherokees and Their Chiefs details the misfortunes that struck the Cherokee culture as a result of European contact, in addition to later dealings with Britain, the American Colonies, and... University of Arkansas Press 1998 Book Summer 1999 Vol. 3 No. 2
Searching for the Great Hopewell Road Thomas Law



The Hopewell culture flourished in the Eastern Woodlands some 2,000 years ago, and its monumental earthworks and beautiful art have captivated and puzzled students of American prehistory for 200 years... Pangea Productions 1999 Book Summer 1999 Vol. 3 No. 2
Peoples of the Northwest Coast: Their Archaeology and Prehistory Kenneth M. Ames
Herbert D.G. Maschner


From northern California to Alaska, the Northwest Coast of North America is one of the continent’s richest cultural areas. Long famous for its magnificent art, it also contains some of... Thames and Hudson 1999 Book Summer 1999 Vol. 3 No. 2
Archaeological Mexico: A Traveler’s Guide to Ancient Cities and Sacred Sites Andrew Coe



At last, a comprehensive guide to archaeological sites throughout Mexico. Included are step-by-step tours of 52 major sites, including maps and illustrations as well as background on the various cultures... Moon Travel Handbooks 1998 Book Fall 1999 Vol. 3 No. 3
The Lords of Tikal: Rulers of an Ancient Maya City Peter Harrison



Rising above the rain forest of remote northern Guatemala, the temples and palaces of Tikal are the most dramatic in the Maya world. With a population that may have reached... Thames & Hudson 1999 Book Fall 1999 Vol. 3 No. 3
The Chaco Meridian: Centers of Political Power in the Ancient Southwest Stephen H. Lekson



Ever since archaeologists discovered the magnificent Anasazi ruins in Chaco Canyon, in the middle of nowhere in the Four Corners region of New Mexico, they’ve been struggling for an explanation.... AltaMira Press 1999 Book Fall 1999 Vol. 3 No. 3
The Myth of Quetzalcoatl Enrique Florescano



no review Johns Hopkins University Press 1999 Book Winter 1999-2000 Vol. 3 No. 4
Legend of the Plumed Serpent: Biography of a Mexican God Neil Baldwin



One might be concerned that the nearly simultaneous publication of two books about the ubiquitous Mesoamerican god-hero Quetzalcoatl, also known as Plumed Serpent, would be redundant. Happily, apart from their... Public Affairs Press 1998 Book Winter 1999-2000 Vol. 3 No. 4
Time, Trees, and Prehistory Stephen Edward Nash



In 1929, astronomer A.E. Douglas revolutionized Southwestern archaeology when he published for the first time precise dates for 40 sites. Until then, prehistoric dates had been merely relative. He did... University of Utah Press 1999 Book Winter 1999-2000 Vol. 3 No. 4
Archaeology, Relics and the Law Richard B. Cunningham



The author, a professor of law at the University of California, has produced an outstanding collection of source materials on federal and state laws relating to antiquities and archaeology. The... Carolina Academic Press 1999 Book Spring 2000 Vol. 4 No. 1
The Ecological Indian: Myth and History Shepard Krech III



Who can forget the poignant pictures of Iron Eyes Cody shedding a tear for the Keep America Beautiful campaign against litter? It’s a memorable image of the noble Indian who... W.W. Norton 1999 Book Spring 2000 Vol. 4 No. 1
Zapotec Civilization: How Urban Society Evolved in Mexico’s Oaxaca Valley Joyce Marcus
Kent V. Flannery


In the remote Valley of Oaxaca in southern Mexico, Monte Albán- the first city of Mesoamerica- and a great Zapotec civilization evolved, flourished, and declined. Renowned archaeologists Joyce Marcus and... Thames & Hudson 1996 Book Spring 1997 Vol. 1 No. 1
Bandelier: The Life and Adventures of Adolph Bandelier Charles H. Lange
Carroll Riley


A great American scholar. Nowhere is Adolph Bandelier so aptly described as on the small plaque in the patio of the visitors’ center at Bandelier National Monument in northern New... University of Utah Press 1996 Book Spring 1997 Vol. 1 No. 1
The Hopewell Mound Group: It’s People and Their Legacy Ohio Historical Society



A new CD-ROM by the Ohio Historical Society is the first of its kind to highlight the famous Hopewell Mound Group. Photos of artifacts will appeal to everyone, while contemporary... CD-ROM presented by the Ohio Historical Society 1995 CD-ROM Spring 1997 Vol. 1 No. 1
Rock Art of Texas Indians Forrest Kirkland
W.W. Newcomb Jr.


Forrest Kirkland’s classic study of Texas rock art has been reissued in all its glory. Between 1934 and 1941, Kirkland, a Dallas artist, meticulously copied pictographs and petroglyphs at som... University of Texas Press 1996 reissue of a 1967 edition Book Summer 1997 Vol. 1 No. 2
The Anasazi of Mesa Verde and the Four Corners William M. Ferguson



The area where New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah come together to form the Four Corners was likely the most intensely occupied area of the United States before the Europeans.... University Press of Colorado 1996 Book Summer 1997 Vol. 1 No. 2
Olmec Art of Ancient Mexico Elizabeth Benson
Beatrix de la Fuente


This magnificent volume served as the catalog for the first comprehensive exhibition of the Olmec art in the U.S., which showed at the National Gallery in Washington last year. The... Abrams/National Gallery of Art 1996 Book Summer 1997 Vol. 1 No. 2
Teotihuacan: An Experiment in Living Esther Pasztory



Just north of Mexico City rise the majestic ruins of Teotihuacan- the largest, most structured city of the ancient Americas. Teotihuacanos and their city flourished for nearly 800 years beginning... University of Oklahoma Press 1997 Book Fall 1997 Vol. 1 No. 3
The Archaeology of the Donner Party Donald L. Hardesty



In 1846, while crossing the Sierra Nevada, more than half of the 89 member Donner Party perished in a surprise blizzard. Those who survived the four-month ordeal did so by... University of Nevada Press 1997 Book Fall 1997 Vol. 1 No. 3
An Archaeological Guide to Northern Central America and An Archaeological Guide to Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula Joyce Kelly



Joyce Kelly’s two archaeological guides to the Maya world are indispensable companions for any traveler to Mexico or Central America. Her first guide (published in 1993) leads the reader to... University of Oklahoma Press 1993 and 1996 Book Fall 1997 Vol. 1 No. 3
Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun: Hernando de Soto and the South’s Ancient Chiefdoms Charles Hudson



Between 1539 and 1542, Hernando de Soto and his little army cut a bloody path through 4,000 miles of the southeastern United States in search of gold and glory. Finding... University of Georgia Press 1997 Book Winter 1997-98 Vol. 1 No. 4
Down by the Station: Los Angeles Chinatown Roberta S. Greenwood



In 1933, the thriving Los Angeles Chinatown was demolished to make way for the new Union Passenger Terminal, sealing the historic remains 14 feet beneath the railroad tracks. In anticipation... Institute of Archaeology 1996 Book Winter 1997-98 Vol. 1 No. 4
Mesa Verde: Legacy of Stone and Spirit Gary Warriner



Gray Warriner continues his outstanding Ancient America video series with a focus on the country’s most popular prehistoric ruin. Mesa Verde seems as though it were made for the camera,... Camera One 1997 Book Winter 1997-98 Vol. 1 No. 4
The World of the Ancient Maya John S. Henderson



For the past 20 years, Maya research has been one of the most exciting fields in all of archaeology. Researchers have discovered great new cities and fantastic tombs. They have... Cornell University Press 1997 Book Spring 1998 Vol. 2 No. 1
Pot Luck: Adventures in Archaeology Florence C. Lister



Between 1940 and 1990, husband-and-wife team Florence and Robert Lister participated in archaeological expeditions, co authored numerous books and articles, and pursued research that took them on countless adventures around... University of New Mexico Press 1997 Book Spring 1998 Vol. 2 No. 1
People in the Past: The Ancient Puebloan Farmers of the Southwest Colorado



This new virtual reality CD-ROM allows users to explore Lowry Pueblo, a prehistoric Anasazi village occupied around a.d. 1000-1300 near present-day Pleasant View, Colorado. With mere clicks of the mouse,... Bureau of Land Management’s Anasazi Heritage Center 1997 CD Rom Spring 1998 Vol. 2 No. 1
Kentucky Archaeology R. Barry Lewis



From burial mounds to frontier cabins, the archaeological record of Kentucky is an impressive one that captures much of the cultural diversity of the interior Southeast. The state spans several... University Press of Kentucky 1997 Book Summer 1998 Vol. 2 No. 2
Excavating Occaneechi Town: Archaeology of an 18th Century Indian Village in North Carolina R. P. Stephen Davis
Patrick C. Livingood
et. al

This electronic site report details years of excavations by University of North Carolina archaeologists at Occaneechi Town, and early 18th-century Occaneechi village on the banks of the Eno River in... University of North Carolina Press 1998 CD Rom Summer 1998 Vol. 2 No. 2
The Apalachee Indians and Mission San Luis John Hann
Bonnie Ewan


In this compelling full-color volume, authors John Hann, a historian, and Bonnie McEwan, an archaeologist, bring alive the story of the Apalachee people of northern Florida and their Spanish conquerors.... University Press of Florida 1998 Book Summer 1998 Vol. 2 No. 2
The Code of Kings: The Language of Seven Sacred Maya Temples and Tombs Linda Schele
Peter Mathews


Part guide book, part scholarly treatise, The Code of Kings is the latest popular offering on the continuing decipherment of Mayan hieroglyphics and an outstanding addition to Maya studies. Authors... Scribner 1998 Book Fall 1998 Vol. 2 No. 3
The Cave Paintings of Baja California: Discovering the Great Murals of an Unknown People Harry W. Crosby



In 1971 Harry Crosby undertook a strenuous trek through the remote and sparsely populated reaches of the Sierra de San Francisco in Baja California to collect oral histories from the... Sunbelt Publications 1998 Book Fall 1998 Vol. 2 No. 3