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 Who We Are

The Archaeological Conservancy is a national 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to acquiring and preserving archaeological sites discovered on private land.

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What We Do

We identify, acquire, secure, and manage the archaeological site as part of a long-term preservation plan. We also engage with and educate the general public about the preservation of our cultural heritage.

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How We Do It

We depend on donations, gifts and grants for the funding needed for preservation. As a supporter, you become a member of the Conservancy and receive a subscription to American Archaeology Magazine.

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Our Magazine

Published quarterly, American Archaeology a popular magazine devoted to the excitement and mystery of archaeology in the U.S. & North America – including Canada and Latin America. 

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Dealing with the Funding Crisis

Winter 2018-19: By David Malakoff In the summer of 1894, archaeologist Ernest Volk of Harvard University was excavating a promising prehistoric site in New Jersey’s...

The Other Bonaparte

Winter 2018-19: By Gayle Keck Napoleon should have listened to his brother. Joseph Bonaparte, the defeated emperor's older sibling, had offered to trade places as...

Ja Mar Site

Ja Mar (Massachusetts) The Ja Mar site is located along the Nemasket River in historic Middleborough, Massachusetts. It was occupied from the Middle Archaic...
In spring and summer, the Mount Bayou Mound is almost completely obscured by the thick growth of the Louisiana riverine environment. Credit:JESSICA CRAWFORD

The Mystery Of Mount Bayou Mound

Mount Bayou Mound (Louisiana)   Site Saved with POINT-6 Emergency Preservation Funds! Donate! Each donation will be matched dollar for dollar! The area in east-central Louisiana,...

Explore the Wonders of the Past

El Tajin was a Totonac capital occupied between AD 500 and 1200. Photo: The Archaeological Conservancy.

From the remote jungles of Honduras to the pristine rivers of the American Southwest, our archaeological tours promise exciting adventure. Whether you like touring Maya temples or learning about North American rock art, you’ll be sure to find a Conservancy tour that fits your interest. For more than 20 years, the Conservancy has conducted tours ranging in length from four days to two weeks. Expert guides always accompany our tours, providing unique insights about the places we visit. Tour regions include the American Midwest, Southeast, and Southwest, as well as Mexico and Central and South America. Click here to see all our tours >>

The Hidden Maya of Chiapas & Tabasco, February 16 – 26, 2019 Info

This tour takes us to some of the more out-of-the-way, but spectacular, Maya ruins in southern Mexico that flourished between A.D. 300 and 900.   We begin in the tropical lowlands and end in the fabulous highlands of Chiapas among the modern Maya people.  We’ll see tremendous pyramids, unbelievable sculptures and murals, and modern arts and crafts.

 

 

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Aztecs, Toltecs & Teotihuacános, March 23 – April 1, 2019 Info

Teotihuacán was once one of the great cities of the New World. Photo TAC/ Mark Michel.
Teotihuacán was once one of the great cities of the New World. Photo TAC/ Mark Michel.

Between 200 B.C. and A.D. 1519, the Aztec, Toltec, and Teotihuacán cultures pushed the development of North American civilization to its zenith, before being destroyed by the Spanish invasion.  On this tour, we’ll see the ancient cities and climb pyramids that rival those of Egypt.

 

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San Juan River Trip 2019: May 25 – June 1, 2019

Take an adventure in the heartland of the Anasazi world with our four-day San Juan River Trip, guided by noted author David Grant Noble, whose books include Ancient Ruins of the Southwest. From land and from the vantage point of Utah’s San Juan River, you’ll experience one of the most scenic regions of the Southwest and explore Anasazi ruins accessible only by water. Learn More.

 

 

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Ohio Moundbuilders: June 5 – June 9, 2019

Hundreds of years ago in what is now part of southern Ohio, a complex culture of moundbuilders flourished.  Extensive earthworks, some towering six stories high, are the legacy of the Hopewell and Adena people, who flourished in the eastern United States from about 800 B.C. to A.D. 400. Mica and copper ornaments, ostentatious burials, and the remains of large wooden structures are often found at their mound sites. Our tour offers an opportunity to discover more about these cultures with visits to some of their most awe-inspiring mounds and earthworks, which are now “short-listed” for designation as a World Heritage Site. Learn More.

 

 

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