American Archaeology’s Current Issue

Current Issue

AA winter 2016-17 Cover. Rediscovering the Alamo

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, WINTER 2016, is now available! COVER: A researcher operates a ground-penetrating radar machine at the Alamo in search of buried artifacts and features. Credit: Reimagine The...
Tourists look at artifacts on display inside the Alamo. Photo Courtesy: Reimagine the Alamo

Winter 2016: By Richard A. Marini. During a month-long investigation of the old Alamo mission in downtown San Antonio this past summer a team of archaeologists found a portion of a collapsed adobe brick wall....
Certain places in the South Mountains captured the attention of Hohokam artisans. Here, petroglyphs of various animal and human forms encircle a spring. The setting provides a panorama of the Salt River Valley, where dozens of Hohokam villages and hundreds of miles of hand-dug canals lie under the asphalt of metropolitan Phoenix.Photo credit: Paul Vanderveen

Winter 2016: By Mike Toner Residents of Phoenix long ago recognized something special about the rugged mountains that rise from the desert south of the city. In 1924, this area became one of the largest...
An artist’s depiction of Moundville sometime after A.D. 1200. By Steven Patricia.

Winter 2016: By Alexandra Witze. In the thirteenth century Moundville, just south of present-day Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was one of the Mississippian culture’s most impressive settlements. It was home to 1,000 or more people at its...
A diver holds a stone cannonball recovered from the Emanuel Point II shipwreck. Photo Credit: UWF Division of Anthropology and Archaeology.

Winter 16: By Tamara J. Stewart. Spanish nobleman don Tristán de Luna y Arellano set out from San Juan de Ulua, Veracruz, in 1559 to establish the first permanent European colony in what is now...
Archaeologist Tom Dillehay (in blue shirt and hat, standing) has directed excavations at Monte Verde in southern Chile for years. Recent research suggests the site could be more than 18,000 years old. Photo Credit: Kenneth Garrett.

Winter 16: By David Malakoff. Two decades ago, when molecular anthropologist Ripan Malhi was a graduate student studying the earliest human inhabitants of North America, he sometimes had to watch his tongue. Malhi and some...

Previous Issues

Book Cover: The Africian Burial Ground in New York City, 2015. American Archaeology Magazine Book Review.

The African Burial Ground in New York City By Andrea E. Frohne (Syracuse University Press, 2015; 444 pgs., illus., $75 cloth, $50 paper; syracuseuniversitypress.syr.edu) In the late 1980s, the General Services Administration (GSA) made plans to build...
American Archaeology Magazine Fall 2016, featuring The Battle to Protect Bears. The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, SUMMER 2016, is now available. COVER: This is one of the numerous Ancestral Pueblo cliff dwellings found in the Bears Ears region. Many of these archaeological sites are unprotected. Credit: Alan Vandendriessche

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, FALL 2016, is now available. COVER: This is one of the numerous Ancestral Pueblo cliff dwellings found in the Bears Ears region. Many of these archaeological...
An ancient granary is one of the region’s numerous archaeological sites. Credit: Josh Ewing.

Fall 2016: By Julian Smith. San Juan County covers almost 8,000 square miles of Utah’s southeast corner. It is the largest and the poorest county in the state, and about half of its 15,000 residents...
The crew excavates in an intertidal zone where the footprint features were found preserved beneath beach sands. Credit: Grant Callegari / Hakai Institute

Fall 2016: By Tom Koppel. “Footprints have raised ridges,” says Duncan McLaren, as he crouches and scrapes with his trowel at the bottom of the seaside pit. “Here, you can see what we think is...
Carved stone slabs from a building on Monte Albán’s Main Plaza show people performing autosacrifice and invoking their ancestors. Credit: Arthur Joyce.

Fall 2016: By Kristin Ohlson. During the dry season, when they weren’t tending their crops, thousands of people left their villages in what is now the Río Verde Valley in the Mexican state of Oaxaca...
Archaeologists excavate around and within Fort Raleigh’s reconstructed earthwork in 1990. CREDIT: Ira Block

Fall 2016: By Paula Neely. On a sunny day last April, several First Colony Foundation (FCF) archaeologists made their way carefully along a narrow stretch of sandy beach at Fort Raleigh National Historic Site on...
A full-size, seaworthy replica of HMS Endeavour is based at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sidney. Credit: Australian National Maritime Museum.

Fall 2016: By Alexandra Witze. The bottom of Newport Harbor, Rhode Island, is a dim and murky place. Sunlight filtering through the seawater illuminates only five, maybe ten feet of the landscape ahead. But occasionally,...
Book Cover- The Pueblo Bonito Mounds of Chaco Canyon: Material Culture and Fauna Edited by Patricia L. Crown (University of New Mexico Press, 2016; 296 pgs., illus., $85 cloth; www.unmpress.com)

The Pueblo Bonito Mounds of Chaco Canyon: Material Culture and Fauna Edited by Patricia L. Crown (University of New Mexico Press, 2016; 296 pgs., illus., $85 cloth; www.unmpress.com) Pueblo Bonito is the largest and most famous of...

American Archaeology Magazine Summer 2016 is now available! COVER: This Late Classic (a.d. 750 - 850) jar likely contained perishable food that the Maya offered to their gods in hopes that the gods would...
A researcher measures pictographs at Doll Ruin in 1959 during the Glen Canyon Project. The site contained 20 pictographs and petroglyphs, most of which were about four-feet tall. The rock art was presumably destroyed by Lake Powell. Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Utah.

Summer 2016: By Wayne Curtis. In 1963, the diversion tunnels allowing the Colorado River to flow around the vast and newly-built Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona were closed and sealed shut. Above it, the...
A self portrait of Josiah Francis wearing a British officer’s uniform. The portrait was drawn in England in 1816, where Francis was living at the time. He later returned to the United States and was captured and executed by Gen. Andrew Jackson in 1818. Copyright The Trustees of the British Museum.

Summer 2016: By Mike Toner. The newly exposed outline of a small cabin and the fire-hardened clay of a 200-year-old hearth bear mute testimony to what was, for a brief moment in time, the holy...
Hale o Keawe Heiau, a temple in the Place of Refuge, is seen in the background. Credit NPS

Summer 2016: By Tamara Stewart. This year is the National Park Service’s centennial, and in honor of that momentous  occasion we’ve selected 5 amazing National Park Gems that feature the vestiges of fascinating and often...
Archaeologists, students, and volunteers document hearths and posts associated with structures that once stood on the southern edge of the Fox Farm village. Credit Art Dickinson.

Summer 2016: By Linda Vaccariello.  On a bright and breezy spring day, when the majority of his University of Kentucky colleagues were focused on the finale of the college basketball season, archaeologist David Pollack was...
This Late Classic (a.d. 750 - 850) jar likely contained perishable food that the Maya offered to their gods in hopes that the gods would reciprocate with rain. The jar was found in situ in Actun Tunichil Muknal Cave in Belize. Credit: Jaime Awe

Summer 2016: By Kristin Ohlson.  In 1989, William Pleitez was hunting near his farm in western Belize when his dog squeezed between some boulders near a hillside and disappeared. Pleitez soon found that the boulders...
Book Cover: Rethinking Moundville

Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland Edited by Vincus P. Steponaitis and C. Margaret Scarry (University Press of Florida, 2016; 344 pgs., illus., $75 cloth; www.upf.com) Moundville, near Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is one of the largest prehistoric mound-builder complexes...