Yorktown (Indiana)

Saving An Ancient Earthwork: The Yorktown Enclosure has significant research potential.

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The Yorktown Enclosure survives within an isolated wood lot surrounded by agricultural fields that are being developed for commercial purposes.
The Yorktown Enclosure survives within an isolated wood lot surrounded by agricultural fields that are being developed for commercial purposes.

The Conservancy has obtained the Yorktown Enclosure, a 2,000-year-old prehistoric earthwork in east-central Indiana. The earthwork was acquired from Larry New, a Muncie, Indiana, real estate developer, as a bargain-sale-to-charity, for only $20,000. The property appraised at more than $100,000.

The Yorktown Enclosure is part of what archaeologists refer to as the New Castle Phase, a period of time between 250 B.C. and A.D. 350 when American Indians constructed relatively small circular earthworks and sometimes sizeable burial mounds in east central Indiana. It is related to the more elaborate Ohio Hopewell culture.

Learn more about the project here: Yorktown Enclosure

Summary.  Read more in American Archaeology Vol. 19 No. 2, Summer 2015

American Archaeology is available on Newsstands and at Bookstores, Subscriptions are available by becoming a member of the Archaeological Conservancy.

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