Vol. 12 No. 4 | Winter 2008 – 2009

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    CONTACT COMMERCE
    An 18th-century village in northern Oklahoma is yielding information about early trade between the Wichita Indians and the French.
    BY DIANE CLAY
    page 20

    THE 920-MILE DIG
    An immense cultural resource management project has its risks and rewards.
    BY MIKE TONER
    page 12

    A NEW LIFE IN NEW PHILADELPHIA
    The town of New Philadelphia was founded by a freed slave in 1836. It was inhabited by blacks and whites during a time of racial strife. Archaeologists are investigating the abandoned town to learn about its race relations.
    BY MALCOLM GAY
    page 26

    WHAT BECAME OF THE HOHOKAM?
    The Hohokam thrived for centuries in southern Arizona before mysteriously collapsing. An ambitious research project offers insights into the causes of the collapse.
    BY TIM VANDERPOOL
    page 32

    A NEW DEAL FOR ARCHAEOLOGY
    During the Great Depression, New Deal programs gave people various jobs, including digging archaeological sites. Despite being untrained, excavators working in southwestern Pennsylvania made an important contribution.
    BY DAVID MALAKOFF
    page 38