The Archaeological Conservancy's

2021 Virtual Lecture Series

A Natural and Cultural History
of Leonard Rockshelter in Nevada

Presented by | Sara Sturtz, Great Basin Archaeologist
on Wed, April 21 at 5 pm MST on Webex Events and Facebook Livestream

LINK TO REGISTER
This will open a new tab for a Webex registration page. For the best experience, downloading the Webex application is recommended. 

Leonard Rockshelter is located in Pershing County, Nevada. Robert Heizer excavated the site in 1950 and recovered a modest assemblage of perishable and lithic artifacts. Of interest to the University of Nevada Reno’s Great Basin Paleoindian Research Unit (GBPRU) was Heizer’s discovery of obsidian flakes in deposits dated to 14,900 to 11,610 BP. The possibility of a stratified Pleistocene occupation prompted the GBPRU to return to Leonard Rock Shelter in 2018 and 2019 for additional work, which produced few artifacts but a sizeable small mammal assemblage.

In our final Spring lecture, Sara will discuss how this small mammal assemblage provides a paleoenvironmental record that demonstrates changing local conditions.  In addition, Sara will also discuss Heizer’s claim of a Pleistocene occupation and when humans actually occupied the shelter.

Sara Sturtz (pictured right) is a Great Basin archaeologist, born and raised in northern Nevada. She graduated with an MA from the University of Nevada, Reno in May of 2020. She is now an associate archaeologist with ASM Affiliates, Inc. in Reno, Nevada.

This lecture series is sponsored by The Archaeological Conservancy and is free our Members and the General Public.  Recorded lectures will also be available on YouTube or on this page after the event.
For questions about the event or how to register, please contact April Brown (tac.connect@gmail.com) or Sarah Webber (saraht.tac@gmail.com).

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| The Archaeological Conservancy 2021

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