Events

See our full listing of upcoming events below or view by category:

Mar
10
Wed
Virtual Lecture | Preserving a Prehistoric City Beneath a Modern Town: The Archaeological Conservancy’s Troyville Preserve @ Webex Events
Mar 10 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Virtual Lecture | Preserving a Prehistoric City Beneath a Modern Town: The Archaeological Conservancy’s Troyville Preserve @ Webex Events

Please join us for a Virtual Lecture on Wed, March 10 at 5 pm MST presented by Southeastern Regional Director Jessica Crawford. 

Preserving a Prehistoric City Beneath a Modern Town: The Archaeological Conservancy’s Troyville Preserve

From about AD 400 to 700, a great settlement was constructed at the confluence of the Tensas, Black and Ouachita Rivers in Louisiana. Named for a local plantation and settlement that was established in the late 1700’s called Troy, the Troyville site originally consisted of nine mounds, the largest was nearly eighty feet with two “terraces” that were topped with what was described as a “flattened cone or dome.” The mounds were surrounded by an embankment on three sides and a river on one.  As the site was being destroyed by the town of Jonesville, Winslow Walker, with the Smithsonian Institution, conducted hurried salvage excavations that revealed woven cane mattings fixed in place with wood stakes, palmetto fronds, preserved wood planks and logs. Believed by many to have been largely destroyed by the town of Jonesville, Louisiana, in 2003, Louisiana archaeologists took a closer look at what lies beneath the town and found that much of the Troyville site remains intact. Since then, the Conservancy has been working to acquire and preserve what remains of this important site and the type-site for the Troyville Culture.  READ MORE HERE.

This lecture series is sponsored by The Archaeological Conservancy and is free to members of the Conservancy and the general public.

Register at this LINK

Mar
24
Wed
Virtual Lecture | Native American Mining in the Upper Mississippi Valley: Industrial Production, Conflict and Dispossession Across the Lead Mining Frontier @ Webex Events
Mar 24 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Virtual Lecture | Native American Mining in the Upper Mississippi Valley: Industrial Production, Conflict and Dispossession Across the Lead Mining Frontier @ Webex Events

Please join us for a Virtual Lecture on Wed, March 24 at 5 pm MST presented by Midwestern Regional Director Philip Millhouse. 

Native American Mining in the Upper Mississippi Valley: Industrial Production, Conflict and Dispossession Across the Lead Mining Frontier

The impact of the fur trade on Native American culture has dominated frontier scholarship for over a century. Absent from many of these discussions is the critical role of Native American lead mining in the Upper Midwest. Here the Meskwaki and Ho-Chunk conducted mining operations on a truly industrial scale. As a stable resource, lead provided a substantial income as fur bearing populations diminished. The mines eventually drew thousands of prospectors and resulting tensions culminated in the Winnebago and Black Hawk Wars. This lecture will discuss Indigenous mining history in the upper Midwest and the subsequent treaties that began the rapacious process of extinguishing Native land claims prior to their forced removal and dispossession.  Find out more.

This lecture series is sponsored by The Archaeological Conservancy and is free to members of the Conservancy and the general public.

Register at this LINK

Apr
7
Wed
Virtual Lecture | The Archaeological Conservancy’s Preservation Efforts in the East: from the Paleolithic through 20th-Century Industrial Sites @ Webex Events
Apr 7 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Virtual Lecture | The Archaeological Conservancy's Preservation Efforts in the East: from the Paleolithic through 20th-Century Industrial Sites @ Webex Events

Please join us for a Virtual Lecture on Wed, April 7 at 5 pm MST presented by Eastern Regional Director Kelley Berliner. 

“The Archaeological Conservancy’s Preservation Efforts in the East: from the Paleolithic through 20th-Century Industrial Sites”

The Archaeological Conservancy’s Preserves in the Eastern Region span a long period of time–from the Thunderbird site, which contains the remains of one of the earliest Paleoindian structures discovered in the country, to the Pamplin Pipe Factory, a manufacturing facility that grew from an early cottage industry of making pipes from local clays. Between are diverse sites including Iroquois/Haudenosaunee villages, prehistoric quarries, French and Indian War fortifications, and more. This talk will highlight some of these important sites and the Conservancy’s efforts to preserve them. READ MORE HERE.

This lecture series is sponsored by The Archaeological Conservancy and is free to members of the Conservancy and the general public.

Register at this LINK