The Magnificent Artifacts Of Key Marco

Winter 2018-19: By Tamara Jager Stewart. Hearing reports of fascinating and incredibly preserved artifacts emerging from the dredged muck on Florida’s southwest coast, Frank Hamilton Cushing with the Bureau of American Ethnology in Washington, D.C....
Scientists who have studied the 8,500-year-old skeleton known as Kennewick Man have come to a number of conclusions about him. This sculpted bust, for example, is their interpretation of what he looked like. Credit: SutdioEIS

The Story of Kennewick Man

Winter 2014: The Story of Kennewick Man By David Malakoff On a warm July day in 1996, Will Thomas and Dave Deacy, two college kids, were watching some speedboat races on the Columbia River near Kennewick,...
Canyon de Chelly’s White House Ruin is seen at the edge of the river. The Lindberghs’ pictures may have played a role in Canyon de Chelly being declared a national monument in 1931. Lindbergh Collection, MIAC/Lab MIAC cat# 70.1 / 197

Charles Lindbergh’s Little-Known Passion

SUMMER 2017: By Tamara Jager Stewart. In 1927 an obscure U.S. Air Mail pilot named Charles A. Lindbergh completed the first solo trans-Atlantic flight from New York to Paris, thereby achieving word-wide fame. Virtually everyone...
Field school students screen excavated dirt in search of eighteenth-century artifacts. Photo Credit: COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG FOUNDATION

Colonial Williamsburg Uncovered

Fall 2018: By Paula Neely. Peering down into the corner of a dig site in Williamsburg, the eighteenth-century capital of Virginia, archaeologist Mark Kostro watched a field school student scrape away dark gray soil from...
Chinese crews lay track for the Central Pacific Railroad along the Humbolt Plains in Nevada in this historical photo. Credit: alfred hart / library of congress, LC-1s00618v

Remembering Historic Achievements: Chinese Railroad Workers in America

Spring 2017: By Julian Smith. On May 10, 1869, a crowd cheered as former California governor Leland Stanford hammered home a ceremonial golden spike at Promontory Point, Utah, marking the completion of the First Transcontinental...
Book Jacket of Beliefs and Rituals in Archaic Eastern North America

Book Review- Beliefs & Rituals in Archaic Eastern North America

Beliefs and Rituals in Archaic Eastern North America: An Interpretive Guide By Cheryl Claassen (University of Alabama Press, 2015; 408 pgs., illus., $60 cloth; www.uapress.ua.edu) Appalachian State University archaeologist Cheryl Claassen has produced this outstanding guide to...
Petroglyph in northern New Mexico shows an anthropomorphic figure with headdress and recurved bow. It is believed that the image was carved sometime between 16th and 18th centuries.

From Atlatls To Arrows

Spring 2015: From Atlatls To Arrows, By Mike Toner. For thousands of years, North America’s ancient people relied on an ingenious spear-throwing device called the atlatl to hunt game and wage war. Then they discovered, and...
A researcher measures pictographs at Doll Ruin in 1959 during the Glen Canyon Project. The site contained 20 pictographs and petroglyphs, most of which were about four-feet tall. The rock art was presumably destroyed by Lake Powell. Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Utah.

The Act That Changed Archaeology

Summer 2016: By Wayne Curtis. In 1963, the diversion tunnels allowing the Colorado River to flow around the vast and newly-built Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona were closed and sealed shut. Above it, the...
The remnants of Fort Stedman at Petersburg National Battlefield are seen here. Confederate forces captured this Union fort in the early morning of March 25, 1865, only to have Union soldiers reclaim it a few hours later.Credit: Buddy Secor.

Summer Travel: A Tour Of Civil War Battlefields

SUMMER 2017: By Paula Neely. By 1860, after decades of discord between northern and southern states over economic policies, state’s rights, and the role of slavery, the United States had become a divided nation. Southern...
Craig Lee (left) and his colleagues Jay Kyne and Ben Woods start to drill an ice core. This is the only invasive technique the researchers employ. Photo INSTAAR/ Jennie Borresen Lee.

Archaeology In The Ice Patches

2015: By Tamara Stewart.  In 2007, archaeologist Craig Lee recovered an incredibly preserved, delicately carved birch spear-throwing foreshaft from a melting ice patch north of Yellowstone National Park. The 10,300-year-old shaft, which Paleo-Indian people used...