SPRING 2020 | A Zest For Maya Archaeology

The following is an article excerpt from the Spring 2020 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full story!  By Tamara Jager Stewart With the passing of Michael Coe at...
An aerial photograph of Serpent Mound taken from a drone. The mound is a National Historic Landmark. Credit: Jarrod Burks.

The Serpent Mound Debate

Fall 2017: By David Malakoff. Anyone who has tried to catch a snake knows the reptiles are elusive. So it only seems appropriate that Serpent Mound, a twisting, quarter-mile long, three-foot-high earthwork in southern Ohio,...

Five Hundred And Counting

Spring 2016: By Tamara Stewart. Back in 1980, Mark Michel was shocked to find the Hopewell Mound Group in Chillicothe, Ohio, the type-site of the great Hopewell culture and one of the best-known archaeological sites...

The Truth in the Tree Rings | American Archaeology

The University of Arizona’s Laboratory of Tree Ring Research was founded in 1937 by astronomer A.E. Douglass and is the premiere laboratory devoted to dendrochronology in the U.S.  By Jasmine Demers This is an article excerpt...
Erebus’ bell was found at the site. The date 1845 is embossed near the top of the bell.

Investigating A Maritime Mystery

Fall 2015: By Tom Koppel  “That's it. That's it,” shouted underwater archaeologist Ryan Harris as the clear outline of a sunken ship suddenly came across his screen in September 2014. His crewmates in the wheelhouse...
COVER: Researchers carefully position a 3-D scanner on the fragile steps of Copán’s Hieroglyphic Stairway. The scans are used to reproduce the stairway. Credit: Barbara Fash

The 3D Past Reproduced

Spring 2018: By Elizabeth Lunday. In 1885, when British scholar Alfred Percival Maudslay and his wife Anne Cary Morris Maudslay first explored the ruins of the Maya city Copán, Morris Maudslay described the unexcavated site...
Objects from the Carroll House cache included shell discs, straight pins, buttons, two pierced coins, a tiny faceted glass bead, a smooth black stone, and large rock crystals. The collection was covered with an overturned pearlware bowl. Archaeology in Annapolis/ University of Maryland

Unearthing Magic of Slaves and Immigrants

Summer 2015: By Julian Smith In the late 17th century, Annapolis enjoyed a thriving economy as the capital of the Maryland colony. An average of at least 300 slaves were brought in every year between 1695...
Archaeologists uncovering postholes on the surface of the bedrock at the METsquare lot.

An Echo of the Miami Circle

Fall 2014 An Echo of the Miami Circle By Michael Bawaya Over the course of approximately two years a vacant lot in the heart of downtown Miami will be transformed into METsquare, an atrium-style complex. METsquare,...
At the tip of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula lies L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site. This 1,000-year-old settlement is the first-known evidence of European presence in the Americas. CREDIT: Dale Wilson / Parks Canada

American Archaeology Fall 2018 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, FALL 2018, is now available! COVER: At the tip of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula lies L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site. This 1,000-year-old settlement is the...
A British soldier shakes hands with a Catawba warrior. A key to the Catawbas’ survival during the Colonial era was the military and economic alliance with the colony of South Carolina. Catawba warriors protected the colony from attacks by natives allied with the French and Spanish and served with the English in their frontier wars. In return, South Carolina granted favored trading status to the Catawba and provided them with firearms, ammunition, and supplies that were critical to their survival. Credit: Carolyn Arcabascio.

Surviving In A Changing World

Fall 2017: By Beth Howard. On a picnic-perfect day in South Carolina’s Lancaster County last June, University of North Carolina (UNC) archaeologist Stephen Davis and his students meticulously scraped loose subsoil and dug, spoonful by...