The Sounds Of The Past | American Archaeology

By Tamara Jager Stewart This is an article excerpt from the Winter 2020 edition of American Archaeology Magazine. Become a member of The Archaeological Conservancy for your complimentary subscription.  Looking around, I saw that I was...

FALL 2019 | The Beginnings Of Slavery

The following is an article excerpt from the Fall 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full story!  By Paula Neely David Givens pointed to a trash pit that...
A British soldier shakes hands with a Catawba warrior. A key to the Catawbas’ survival during the Colonial era was the military and economic alliance with the colony of South Carolina. Catawba warriors protected the colony from attacks by natives allied with the French and Spanish and served with the English in their frontier wars. In return, South Carolina granted favored trading status to the Catawba and provided them with firearms, ammunition, and supplies that were critical to their survival. Credit: Carolyn Arcabascio.

Surviving In A Changing World

Fall 2017: By Beth Howard. On a picnic-perfect day in South Carolina’s Lancaster County last June, University of North Carolina (UNC) archaeologist Stephen Davis and his students meticulously scraped loose subsoil and dug, spoonful by...
Cherokee lifestyles and history are on display at Oconaluftee Indian Village. Credit: EBCI DESTINATION MARKETING

A Tour Of Western North Carolina’s Rich Archaeology & History

Summer 2018: By Andrea Cooper. We rounded a corner in the Rankin Museum of American Heritage in Ellerbe, North Carolina (population 986), when my husband burst out laughing with delight.  Behind glass cases is a...
Ed Carriere weaves a cattail basket. He also wove the cedar-bark vest and cedar-bark hat he’s wearing. Credit: FREDRICK DENT

A Meeting Of Science And Culture: Ancient Basketry

Fall 2018: By Julian Smith Suquamish elder and master basketmaker Ed Carriere was thrilled when he first saw the fragments of ancient cedar baskets in the Biderbost Collection at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum...

SPRING 2019 PREVIEW | Harvard’s History Lesson

The following is an excerpt from the Spring 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  By Elaine K. Howley COVER IMAGE: The excavators have recovered numerous pipes. This white clay pipe with a partially broken stem dates to...

Summer 2016

American Archaeology Magazine Summer 2016 is now available! COVER: This Late Classic (a.d. 750 - 850) jar likely contained perishable food that the Maya offered to their gods in hopes that the gods would...
A researcher measures pictographs at Doll Ruin in 1959 during the Glen Canyon Project. The site contained 20 pictographs and petroglyphs, most of which were about four-feet tall. The rock art was presumably destroyed by Lake Powell. Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Utah.

The Act That Changed Archaeology

Summer 2016: By Wayne Curtis. In 1963, the diversion tunnels allowing the Colorado River to flow around the vast and newly-built Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona were closed and sealed shut. Above it, the...

The Search For Sarabay | American Archaeology

By Stephenie Livingston | The sparsely populated barrier island of Big Talbot looks much like it did when Europeans first met the local Mocama-speaking Timucua people nearly 450 years ago. Keith Ashley, a University of...
This image depicting a woman giving birth is one of the amazing petroglyphs at Rock Art Ranch.

Putting The Petroglyphs In Context

Fall 2015: Putting The Petroglyphs In Context, By Tamara Stewart Escaping from the blistering desert heat, we are drawn down the worn stone steps into Chevelon Canyon, toward the cool oasis of flowing water and...