Archaeologists Steve Copeland and Caitlin Sommer document features on the floor of the great kiva.

Searching For The Origins Of Pueblo Culture

Spring 2015: Searching For The Origins Of Pueblo Culture By Tamara Stewart. Dirt flies as archaeologists Caitlin Sommer and Steve Copeland, along with many volunteers, search for the hearth in the Dillard site’s great kiva. Since...
The crew excavates in an intertidal zone where the footprint features were found preserved beneath beach sands. Credit: Grant Callegari / Hakai Institute

Stepping Into The Past

Fall 2016: By Tom Koppel. “Footprints have raised ridges,” says Duncan McLaren, as he crouches and scrapes with his trowel at the bottom of the seaside pit. “Here, you can see what we think is...
A petroglyph near the site of Las Crucitas, Honduras that Chris Begley believes may represent a feathered serpent. Credit Chris Begley.

A Lost City Found?

Summer 2015: By Charles C. Poling On March 2, 2015, a news story on the National Geographic website announced the discovery of an ancient “lost city” that was once inhabited by a mysterious culture in the...
An artist’s depiction of Moundville sometime after A.D. 1200. By Steven Patricia.

A New View Of Moundville

Winter 2016: By Alexandra Witze. In the thirteenth century Moundville, just south of present-day Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was one of the Mississippian culture’s most impressive settlements. It was home to 1,000 or more people at its...
Certain places in the South Mountains captured the attention of Hohokam artisans. Here, petroglyphs of various animal and human forms encircle a spring. The setting provides a panorama of the Salt River Valley, where dozens of Hohokam villages and hundreds of miles of hand-dug canals lie under the asphalt of metropolitan Phoenix.Photo credit: Paul Vanderveen

A Sense Of Place: Hohokam Rock Art

Winter 2016: By Mike Toner Residents of Phoenix long ago recognized something special about the rugged mountains that rise from the desert south of the city. In 1924, this area became one of the largest...
Objects from the Carroll House cache included shell discs, straight pins, buttons, two pierced coins, a tiny faceted glass bead, a smooth black stone, and large rock crystals. The collection was covered with an overturned pearlware bowl. Archaeology in Annapolis/ University of Maryland

Unearthing Magic of Slaves and Immigrants

Summer 2015: By Julian Smith In the late 17th century, Annapolis enjoyed a thriving economy as the capital of the Maryland colony. An average of at least 300 slaves were brought in every year between 1695...
The excavation area of Old Vero Man site is protected from the elements by a tent-like structure called a WeatherPort. courtesy of Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute.

Revisiting Old Vero Man

Summer 2015: By Tamara Stewart In 1916, as Florida State geologist Elias Sellards stood on the bank of Van Valkenberg Creek, which has run along Florida’s eastern coastal region for the last 14,000 years, he...
The researchers have found several clay figurines, most of which, like this example, depict women. These figurines have hollow areas, mouthpieces, and holes that enabled them to serve as whistles. They were primarily imported from Lubaantun and other inland sites. Credit: Heather McKillop.

A Story Of Salt: Ancient Maya Saltworks

Spring 2017: By Elizabeth Lunday. Salt is a substance so ordinary and inexpensive today that its ready supply is often taken for granted. Yet salt is essential: humans need salt to live and also crave...
Archaeologist Tom Dillehay (in blue shirt and hat, standing) has directed excavations at Monte Verde in southern Chile for years. Recent research suggests the site could be more than 18,000 years old. Photo Credit: Kenneth Garrett.

How Were The Americas Colonized?

Winter 16: By David Malakoff. Two decades ago, when molecular anthropologist Ripan Malhi was a graduate student studying the earliest human inhabitants of North America, he sometimes had to watch his tongue. Malhi and some...
Cliff Palace is the largest alcove habitation in Mesa Verde National Park. One of its 23 kivas has a beam that was dated to a.d. 1280, marking it as one of the last sites in the region to be abandoned.

Grappling With A Great Mystery

Summer 2015: By David Malakoff It had seemed like a good idea at the time. In the spring of A.D. 1250, you and your new spouse decided to move away from the hamlet where you were...