This illustration of numerous shell mounds at the Turner River Shellworks site in Ten Thousand Islands, Florida, is based on archaeological evidence.Credit: MARTIN PATE, COURTESY MARGO SCHWADRON, NPS

Rethinking Shell Middens

Summer 2018: By David Malakoff In the fall of 2005, Hurricane Wilma, a powerful storm packing 120-mile-an-hour winds, smashed into the Ten Thousand Islands, a fifty-mile-long maze of mangrove-ringed islets on the Florida’s southwestern coast....

WINTER 2019 | And Yet, They Persisted

The following is an article excerpt from the Winter 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full story!  By Gayle Keck At Mak-‘amham restaurant in Berkeley, California, you can...
American Archaeology Magazine winter 2017 is Here!

American Archaeology Magazine Winter 2017 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, WINTER 2017, is now available! COVER: Shumla researchers Jerod Roberts (on ladder) and Karen Steelman use a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument to identify the elemental composition...
Portland State University and Bureau of Land Management archaeologists work at Port Clarence, where frequent looting took place. Credit: Shelby Anderson

Artifacts For Sale

Spring 2016: By Julian Smith. When Shelby Anderson of Portland State University arrived at Port Clarence in western Alaska to conduct an archaeological survey in 2013, she was astonished at what she found. The narrow...
Ed Carriere weaves a cattail basket. He also wove the cedar-bark vest and cedar-bark hat he’s wearing. Credit: FREDRICK DENT

A Meeting Of Science And Culture: Ancient Basketry

Fall 2018: By Julian Smith Suquamish elder and master basketmaker Ed Carriere was thrilled when he first saw the fragments of ancient cedar baskets in the Biderbost Collection at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum...
An artist’s depiction of the Hohokam gathered at one of their ballcourts. Credit: Artwork by Rob Ciaccio, Courtesy Archaeology Southwest.

The Mystery Of Hohokam Ballcourts

Spring 2018: By Alexandra Witze. From the Olmec to the Maya to the Aztec, ballgames were one of the defining activities of Mesoamerican cultures. Beginning some time before 1200 B.C., competitors kicked and whacked rubber...

A New Take On Maryland’s Oldest City | American Archaeology

By David Malakoff | The nearly 400-year-old silver coin was, Stephanie Stevens recalled, “the most memorable artifact I’ve ever found.” Last fall, the young archaeologist was scooping dirt at a dig in St. Mary’s City, Maryland’s...

Rich Man, Poor Man

Summer 2018: By Wayne Curtis. In the first half of the first millennium A.D., Teotihuacan in central Mexico was the largest city in the western hemisphere. At its peak, it had about 125,000 residents and...

Read articles from the latest issue of American Archaeology

The Summer 2021 Edition of American Archaeology Magazine is available now! You can now read excerpts from the latest edition of American Archaeology Magazine HERE.  To read the full articles, you can purchase your copy...
This portrait painted in 1710 shows the extensively tattooed Mohawk leader Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pleth Tow. Credit: Mezzotint by John Simon, after painting by John Verlest

American Archaeology Wins Its Fifth Gene S. Stuart Award

The article “Discovering the Archaeology of Tattooing” by Gayle Keck has won the Gene S. Stuart Award. The award, which is bestowed by the Society For American Archaeology, is given to the author of...