Recent fieldwork adjacent to the mansion has revealed important changes in the ornamental landscape. Credit: Mark East.

Reading Jefferson’s Landscape

Winter 2017: By David Malakoff. At first glance, it might not seem like much for archaeologists to work with. At Monticello there are microscopic grains of pollen that wafted from pine and oak trees more...
An artist’s depiction of Paleo-Indians at Wakulla Springs. The man on the left is working a mastodon tusk. Credit: Barbara Taillefer.

Of Mastodons And Men

Fall 2018: By Tamara Jager Stewart. For millennia, humans have flocked to the lush region now known as the Aucilla River drainage in north-central Florida. Some twenty miles to the west, an underground river emanates...

WINTER 2019 | A Glimpse of Early Agriculture

The following is an article excerpt from the Winter 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full story!  By Julian Smith Last summer and fall, drivers on Interstate 10...
This image depicting a woman giving birth is one of the amazing petroglyphs at Rock Art Ranch.

Putting The Petroglyphs In Context

Fall 2015: Putting The Petroglyphs In Context, By Tamara Stewart Escaping from the blistering desert heat, we are drawn down the worn stone steps into Chevelon Canyon, toward the cool oasis of flowing water and...

American Archaeology’s Ten Most Interesting Articles Of 2017

As editor, I chose these amazing archaeology stories from the pages of American Archaeology magazine because each of them stood out for 2017 in some way—from the highly-disputed contention that humans occupied southern California...

A Copper Conundrum | American Archaeology

By David Malakoff This is an article excerpt from the Spring 2021 edition of American Archaeology Magazine. Become a member of The Archaeological Conservancy for your complimentary subscription.  In the late 1990s, William Reardon, a U.S....

Upholding The Law | American Archaeology

By David Malakoff This is an article excerpt from the Fall 2020 edition of American Archaeology Magazine. Become a member of The Archaeological Conservancy for your complimentary subscription.  The first glimpse was unforgettable and “overwhelming,” recalled...

The Sounds Of The Past | American Archaeology

By Tamara Jager Stewart This is an article excerpt from the Winter 2020 edition of American Archaeology Magazine. Become a member of The Archaeological Conservancy for your complimentary subscription.  Looking around, I saw that I was...
An ancient granary is one of the region’s numerous archaeological sites. Credit: Josh Ewing.

The Bears Ears Controversy

Fall 2016: By Julian Smith. San Juan County covers almost 8,000 square miles of Utah’s southeast corner. It is the largest and the poorest county in the state, and about half of its 15,000 residents...
This portrait painted in 1710 shows the extensively tattooed Mohawk leader Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pleth Tow. Credit: Mezzotint by John Simon, after painting by John Verlest

American Archaeology Wins Its Fifth Gene S. Stuart Award

The article “Discovering the Archaeology of Tattooing” by Gayle Keck has won the Gene S. Stuart Award. The award, which is bestowed by the Society For American Archaeology, is given to the author of...