SPRING 2020 | Aviation Archaeology Takes Flight

The following is an article excerpt from the Spring 2020 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full story!  By David Malakoff “It was the most horrible thing I have...
Eye-catching cobalt, vermilion, and red ochre pigments embellish the interior of San Miguel Arcángel. Rubén G. Mendoza.

Visiting California’s Historic Missions

Summer 2015: By Gayle Keck  It was 1782, and an earthquake had ripped through Alta California. "In Santa Clara, it broke a bottle of brandy," Father Junípero Serra noted, "which the poor Fathers there were jealously...

The Magnificent Artifacts Of Key Marco

Winter 2018-19: By Tamara Jager Stewart. Hearing reports of fascinating and incredibly preserved artifacts emerging from the dredged muck on Florida’s southwest coast, Frank Hamilton Cushing with the Bureau of American Ethnology in Washington, D.C....

The Sounds Of The Past | American Archaeology

By Tamara Jager Stewart This is an article excerpt from the Winter 2020 edition of American Archaeology Magazine. Become a member of The Archaeological Conservancy for your complimentary subscription.  Looking around, I saw that I was...
An artist’s depiction of the Hohokam gathered at one of their ballcourts. Credit: Artwork by Rob Ciaccio, Courtesy Archaeology Southwest.

The Mystery Of Hohokam Ballcourts

Spring 2018: By Alexandra Witze. From the Olmec to the Maya to the Aztec, ballgames were one of the defining activities of Mesoamerican cultures. Beginning some time before 1200 B.C., competitors kicked and whacked rubber...
These fragments of German stoneware tankards were discovered in the stone-walled cellar. They date to the early-to-mid 1700s.Credit: Neill De Paoli .

Life On The Northern Frontier

2015: By Wayne Curtis. A few yards from an immaculately-maintained late-18th-century Georgian house in southern Maine is an equally immaculate hole in the ground, its edges as precise as if cut with a miter saw....
Researchers excavate the middle structure of the three structures that were built on top of each other at Carter Robinson Mounds. Credit: JC Burns.

Life On The Frontier

Fall 2017: By Linda Vaccariello. A few miles east of the narrow gap in the Cumberland Mountains where Daniel Boone and his companions blazed a trail into Kentucky, Maureen Meyers is puzzling over another group...

SPRING 2019 PREVIEW | A Glimpse Of The First Americans

The following is an excerpt from the Spring 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  By David Malakoff COVER IMAGE:  A researcher works at Trail Creek Cave 2 in Alaska, where DNA was extracted from the tooth of...
Book Cover: Rethinking Moundville

Book Review – Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland

Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland Edited by Vincus P. Steponaitis and C. Margaret Scarry (University Press of Florida, 2016; 344 pgs., illus., $75 cloth; www.upf.com) Moundville, near Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is one of the largest prehistoric mound-builder complexes...
Ed Carriere weaves a cattail basket. He also wove the cedar-bark vest and cedar-bark hat he’s wearing. Credit: FREDRICK DENT

A Meeting Of Science And Culture: Ancient Basketry

Fall 2018: By Julian Smith Suquamish elder and master basketmaker Ed Carriere was thrilled when he first saw the fragments of ancient cedar baskets in the Biderbost Collection at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum...