Summer 2019 - Friends followers and retweets S1

SUMMER 2019 | Friends, Followers, And Retweets

The following is an article excerpt from the Summer 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full issue!  By Elizabeth Lunday More than a thousand years ago, women living...
American Archaeology Magazine Fall 2016, featuring The Battle to Protect Bears. The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, SUMMER 2016, is now available. COVER: This is one of the numerous Ancestral Pueblo cliff dwellings found in the Bears Ears region. Many of these archaeological sites are unprotected. Credit: Alan Vandendriessche

American Archaeology Magazine Fall 2016 Is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, FALL 2016, is now available. COVER: This is one of the numerous Ancestral Pueblo cliff dwellings found in the Bears Ears region. Many of these archaeological...

A Sneak Peak: Understanding the Prehistoric Landscape of Rock Art Ranch

Sneak Peak Ahead Field Blog for Fall 2015 Our intrepid reporter, Tamara Stewart, visited Chevelon Canyon and Rock Art Ranch.  Join her for a Sneak Peak at some reporting in the field underway for our...
Hale o Keawe Heiau, a temple in the Place of Refuge, is seen in the background. Credit NPS

Summer Travel: 5 Hidden National Park Gems

Summer 2016: By Tamara Stewart. This year is the National Park Service’s centennial, and in honor of that momentous  occasion we’ve selected 5 amazing National Park Gems that feature the vestiges of fascinating and often...
The excavation of La Belle took place inside a steel cofferdam with the seawater removed.

Vive La Belle: Reconstructing La Salle’s Ship

Spring 2015: Vive La Belle, By Elizabeth Lunday. In the spring of 1684, a team labored to assemble a ship in the port town of Rochefort in southwest France. They fastened timbers using iron bolts and...
American Archaeology Magazine winter 2017 is Here!

American Archaeology Magazine Winter 2017 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, WINTER 2017, is now available! COVER: Shumla researchers Jerod Roberts (on ladder) and Karen Steelman use a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument to identify the elemental composition...
Archaeologists David Sandrock and Bo Nelson clean the bottom of an excavation unit. The lines scratched into the unit wall help show different layers in the sediments. Credit: Michael Amador, TxDOT

The Road To Prehistory

Winter 2015: By Elizabeth Lunday. U.S. Highway 175 emerges from the sprawl of Dallas, shaking off the suburbs as it stretches southeast. Just beyond the city of Athens, this four-lane highway narrows to two lanes....
Archaeologists, students, and volunteers document hearths and posts associated with structures that once stood on the southern edge of the Fox Farm village. Credit Art Dickinson.

The Mystery Of The Fort Ancient Transformation

Summer 2016: By Linda Vaccariello.  On a bright and breezy spring day, when the majority of his University of Kentucky colleagues were focused on the finale of the college basketball season, archaeologist David Pollack was...
This portrait painted in 1710 shows the extensively tattooed Mohawk leader Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pleth Tow. Credit: Mezzotint by John Simon, after painting by John Verlest

Discovering The Archaeology Of Tattooing

Spring 2018: By Gayle Keck. In old Western movies, Indians were invariably depicted galloping into the scene whooping and streaked with war paint. At least one aspect of that cliché is true. Native Americans did...
An aerial view of the excavations on Burial Hill. The grey structure with the black and brick doors is an 1830s burial vault that cuts through the site. Excavations in front of and behind the vault revealed a series of building postholes, trash pits, and many seventeenthcentury artifacts from the original settlement. Native American and English pottery was found in the trash pits, suggesting the use of Native pots in the English houses. Credit: Bruce T. Martin.

Finding The Pilgrims

Fall 2017: By Rachael Moeller Gorman. On a sticky day last June, archaeologist David Landon peered into a rectangular, three-foot-deep excavation unit on the edge of an old cemetery. “That layer they’re coming down on,...