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From American Archaeology Magazine

A Snapshot of Subsistence and Rebellion

By Kelley Berliner VERMONT | The Egg Mountain site consists of a hillside settlement that was likely occupied from the late 1700s until approximately 1820. At least a dozen cellar holes, combined with stone walls...

See what’s coming in the Summer Issue of American Archaeology

Get a preview of the summer issue of American Archaeology Magazine HERE!  Read article excerpts, book reviews, and more!  TAC Members should receive a copy in the mail soon!  Non-members can find a copy on...

Identifying Good Government

By Michael Bawaya In August of 1970, the renowned anthropologist Robert Carneiro published a paper titled “A Theory of the Origin of the State” in the journal Science. The paper explored the theories that had...

The Altered States Of America

By Gayle Keck The present is catching up to the past. For millennia, Native Americans have entered altered states of consciousness for social, ceremonial, recreational, and medicinal reasons. Now, in modern times, substances that induce...

The Story Of Marshall’s Pen

By David Malakoff In the early 1800s, Alexander Lindsay, a retired British general who was a former governor of Jamaica and the sixth Earl of Balcarres, sensed an opportunity to cash in on Europe’s thirst...

Rewriting The History Of The Rappahannocks

By Paula Neely For years, Anne Richardson, chief of the Rappahannock tribe, gathered with her people for ceremonies and summer fish fries at several locations along the Rappahannock River in Virginia. She didn’t realize the...

A Glimpse Of New York’s Past

By Jackie Rocheleau Most visitors to New York State begin and end their trips in New York City. But those traveling outside the urban center can experience the rich history of the region across the...

Read highlights from the Spring issue of American Archaeology

The Spring 2022 edition of American Archaeology is now available!  Get your copy on select newsstands nationwide or become a member of The Archaeological Conservancy for your complimentary subscription.  Read highlights from the latest...

Horses And People

By Julian Smith One of the most enduring icons of the American West is a Native American rider on horseback, galloping into battle or chasing down a herd of buffalo. For all of its cultural...

The Maya Collapse Revisited

By Mike Toner Ever since explorers John Stephens and Frederick Catherwood stumbled out of the Yucatán Peninsula’s jungles two centuries ago with headline-making tales of crumbling stone ruins, scholars have struggled to explain what happened...