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American Archaeology Magazine, Spring 2014 Issue

American Archaeology Magazine Spring 2014 Issue

The recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, Spring 2014, is now available. Cover Photo: Numerous historic-period sites have yielded the kind of exquisite marine shell ornaments seen here. A recent study purports to have solved the...
Tooru Nakahira (left) and Anna Shishido (center), two former internees at Amache, point to a diagram of the barracks where they were once confined. The barracks have been reconstructed (background) based on historical and archaeological evidence. Credit: Nancy Ukai

A Case For Collaboration

Spring 2018: By Julian Smith. In 2016, Bonnie Clark of the University of Denver was running an archaeology field school at the Granada War Relocation Center, a Japanese American internment camp in southeast Colorado, when a...
An artist’s depiction of the Hohokam gathered at one of their ballcourts. Credit: Artwork by Rob Ciaccio, Courtesy Archaeology Southwest.

The Mystery Of Hohokam Ballcourts

Spring 2018: By Alexandra Witze. From the Olmec to the Maya to the Aztec, ballgames were one of the defining activities of Mesoamerican cultures. Beginning some time before 1200 B.C., competitors kicked and whacked rubber...

Fall 2015 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, Fall 2015 , is now available. COVER: A side-scan sonar image of HMS Erebus, the flagship of the ill-fated 1845 Sir John Franklin expedition in search of a...

SPRING 2019 PREVIEW | His Life As A Field Archaeologist

The following is an excerpt from the Spring 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine. By Tamara Jager Stewart COVER IMAGE: Wendorf poses in front of an excavation trench at a salvage project in New Mexico in...
This portrait painted in 1710 shows the extensively tattooed Mohawk leader Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pleth Tow. Credit: Mezzotint by John Simon, after painting by John Verlest

Discovering The Archaeology Of Tattooing

Spring 2018: By Gayle Keck. In old Western movies, Indians were invariably depicted galloping into the scene whooping and streaked with war paint. At least one aspect of that cliché is true. Native Americans did...
Spanish glass Beads were popular trade items with Native Americans.

Searching for de Soto

Fall 2014 Searching for de Soto By Kristin Ohlson: The Atlanta high school girl was in the middle of a solitary stint at the sifting screen, while archaeologist Dennis Blanton and the rest of...
Canyon de Chelly’s White House Ruin is seen at the edge of the river. The Lindberghs’ pictures may have played a role in Canyon de Chelly being declared a national monument in 1931. Lindbergh Collection, MIAC/Lab MIAC cat# 70.1 / 197

Charles Lindbergh’s Little-Known Passion

SUMMER 2017: By Tamara Jager Stewart. In 1927 an obscure U.S. Air Mail pilot named Charles A. Lindbergh completed the first solo trans-Atlantic flight from New York to Paris, thereby achieving word-wide fame. Virtually everyone...
Summer 2014 Cover Small

Summer 2014

The cover of past issue of American Archaeology Magazine, Summer 2014 Cover Photo: A Native American holds an elaborate pipe in this mid-19th century illustration by the noted artist Karl Bodmer. Photo Credit: Rare Books Division, The New...
ummer 2019 - Touring Ancient Museums T5

SUMMER 2019 | Touring Ancient Art Museums

The following is an article excerpt from the Summer 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full issue!  By Tamara Jager Stewart The Southwest is world-renowned for its abundance...