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From American Archaeology Magazine

This image depicting a woman giving birth is one of the amazing petroglyphs at Rock Art Ranch.

Putting The Petroglyphs In Context

Fall 2015: Putting The Petroglyphs In Context, By Tamara Stewart Escaping from the blistering desert heat, we are drawn down the worn stone steps into Chevelon Canyon, toward the cool oasis of flowing water and...
Archaeologists uncovering postholes on the surface of the bedrock at the METsquare lot.

An Echo of the Miami Circle

Fall 2014 An Echo of the Miami Circle By Michael Bawaya Over the course of approximately two years a vacant lot in the heart of downtown Miami will be transformed into METsquare, an atrium-style complex. METsquare,...
Ed Carriere weaves a cattail basket. He also wove the cedar-bark vest and cedar-bark hat he’s wearing. Credit: FREDRICK DENT

A Meeting Of Science And Culture: Ancient Basketry

Fall 2018: By Julian Smith Suquamish elder and master basketmaker Ed Carriere was thrilled when he first saw the fragments of ancient cedar baskets in the Biderbost Collection at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum...
Pueblo Bonito is Chaco Canyon’s largest great house. A number of macaws, which are thought to have been imported from Mesoamerica by Chaco’s upper class, were found here. Credit: Chaz Evans.

Chaco’s Upper Class

2015: By Charles C. Poling. Chaco Canyon has puzzled and intrigued archaeologists for almost 120 years. Despite the abundance of archaeological remains, scholars know relatively little about the people who lived there, including when they...
This four-hole ocarina, which came from northwest Costa Rica, is shaped like a mythical animal. (c) President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. PM# 976-59-20/24969.

An Instrument For The Ages

Fall 2017: By Gayle Keck. You might have had one when you were a kid. You might have encountered a magical one while playing a popular video game. You might even have an app on...
Canyon de Chelly’s White House Ruin is seen at the edge of the river. The Lindberghs’ pictures may have played a role in Canyon de Chelly being declared a national monument in 1931. Lindbergh Collection, MIAC/Lab MIAC cat# 70.1 / 197

Charles Lindbergh’s Little-Known Passion

SUMMER 2017: By Tamara Jager Stewart. In 1927 an obscure U.S. Air Mail pilot named Charles A. Lindbergh completed the first solo trans-Atlantic flight from New York to Paris, thereby achieving word-wide fame. Virtually everyone...
Viva La Belle: Reconstructing La Salle's Ship.

Spring 2015 is Here

The recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, Spring 2015 , is now available. COVER: Peter Fix (foreground) and Jim Bruseth reassemble the hull timbers of La Belle, the ship of the French explorer Robert Cavelier, Sier...

FALL 2019 | The Omnipresence Of Telepresence

The following is an article excerpt from the Fall 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  Become a member to subscribe and read the full story!  By David Malakoff One evening this past May, maritime archaeologist Michael...
than 13,000 artifacts, some dating back 5,000 years, along this three-mile passage called Broadway. Photo Credit: NPS

Celebrating A Centennial

Spring 2016: By Margaret Shakespeare By the turn of the 20th century the secret was out. Maverick rancher and outdoorsman Theodore Roosevelt knew it. The Swedish archaeologist Gustaf N. A. Nordenskiöld knew it. Adventurers, photographers,...
Jarrod Trombley excavates sediments in the ancient ditch that marks the outer edge of the Great Circle.

A Hopewell Woodhenge

Winter 2014 A Hopewell Woodhenge By Dave Ghose Two excavators dug a long, narrow trench in the flat, vacant landscape. They were part of a small crew that worked quietly in an unremarkable patch of the...