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By around 1680, African American Maroons established communities on islands in the swamp. The woman pictured here is fashioning a tool while keeping an eye on her children. Credit: Carolyn Arcabascio

Life In The Great Dismal Swamp

Spring 2017: By David Malakoff. “I sometimes ask myself why I didn’t do one of those projects where the dig is right next to the parking lot.” Archaeologist Becca Peixotto wasn’t complaining, but she sounded...
These anthropomorphic figures are part of a Pecos River-style mural known as Rattlesnake Canyon. This represents only about one-tenth of the enormous mural, which is more than 100-feet long and ten-feet high.

Saving An Ancient Library

Winter 2017: By Richard A. Marini. Having scrambled about the shallow, open-air rock shelter known as the Wiley site in southwest Texas, six archaeologists took inventory of the many iconographic figures painted on the shelter...
Sarah Anzick (in red jacket) places dirt in the grave of the Clovis-age child who was reburied in a public ceremony. Credit: Michael Waters, Center for the Study of the First Americans.

The Fates Of Very Ancient Remains

SUMMER 2017: By Mike Toner  To some Native Americans, the repatriation and reburial of very ancient human remains is simple justice. To many archaeologists and other scientists, it’s akin to reburying the Rosetta stone. “Every...
Book Cover: The Africian Burial Ground in New York City, 2015. American Archaeology Magazine Book Review.

Book Review – The African Burial Ground in New York City

The African Burial Ground in New York City By Andrea E. Frohne (Syracuse University Press, 2015; 444 pgs., illus., $75 cloth, $50 paper; syracuseuniversitypress.syr.edu) In the late 1980s, the General Services Administration (GSA) made plans to build...
Summer 2014 Cover Small

Summer 2014

The cover of past issue of American Archaeology Magazine, Summer 2014 Cover Photo: A Native American holds an elaborate pipe in this mid-19th century illustration by the noted artist Karl Bodmer. Photo Credit: Rare Books Division, The New...
Petroglyph in northern New Mexico shows an anthropomorphic figure with headdress and recurved bow. It is believed that the image was carved sometime between 16th and 18th centuries.

From Atlatls To Arrows

Spring 2015: From Atlatls To Arrows, By Mike Toner. For thousands of years, North America’s ancient people relied on an ingenious spear-throwing device called the atlatl to hunt game and wage war. Then they discovered, and...

SPRING 2019 PREVIEW | Righting Wrongs At Effigy Mounds

The following is an excerpt from the Spring 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  By Julian Smith COVER IMAGE: Effigy Mounds’ officials bought so many new pieces of construction equipment that a shed was built to hold...
This image depicting a woman giving birth is one of the amazing petroglyphs at Rock Art Ranch.

Putting The Petroglyphs In Context

Fall 2015: Putting The Petroglyphs In Context, By Tamara Stewart Escaping from the blistering desert heat, we are drawn down the worn stone steps into Chevelon Canyon, toward the cool oasis of flowing water and...
Newspaper Rock is one of Gold Butte National Monument’s amazing petroglyph panels. Gold Butte, located in Nevada, was recently designated a national monument to protect cultural resources like Newspaper Rock, but some people opposed the designation. Kurt Kuznicki/Friends of Nevada Wilderness

Archaeology Under Attack

Spring 2017: By Tamara Jager Stewart. In the late 1980s, while working in Wisconsin, Lynne Goldstein, now archaeology professor and director of the Campus Archaeology Program at Michigan State University, served on a panel working...
COVER: Researchers carefully position a 3-D scanner on the fragile steps of Copán’s Hieroglyphic Stairway. The scans are used to reproduce the stairway. Credit: Barbara Fash

The 3D Past Reproduced

Spring 2018: By Elizabeth Lunday. In 1885, when British scholar Alfred Percival Maudslay and his wife Anne Cary Morris Maudslay first explored the ruins of the Maya city Copán, Morris Maudslay described the unexcavated site...