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At the tip of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula lies L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site. This 1,000-year-old settlement is the first-known evidence of European presence in the Americas. CREDIT: Dale Wilson / Parks Canada

American Archaeology Fall 2018 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, FALL 2018, is now available! COVER: At the tip of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula lies L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site. This 1,000-year-old settlement is the...
Canyon de Chelly’s White House Ruin is seen at the edge of the river. The Lindberghs’ pictures may have played a role in Canyon de Chelly being declared a national monument in 1931. Lindbergh Collection, MIAC/Lab MIAC cat# 70.1 / 197

Charles Lindbergh’s Little-Known Passion

SUMMER 2017: By Tamara Jager Stewart. In 1927 an obscure U.S. Air Mail pilot named Charles A. Lindbergh completed the first solo trans-Atlantic flight from New York to Paris, thereby achieving word-wide fame. Virtually everyone...
Chinese crews lay track for the Central Pacific Railroad along the Humbolt Plains in Nevada in this historical photo. Credit: alfred hart / library of congress, LC-1s00618v

Remembering Historic Achievements: Chinese Railroad Workers in America

Spring 2017: By Julian Smith. On May 10, 1869, a crowd cheered as former California governor Leland Stanford hammered home a ceremonial golden spike at Promontory Point, Utah, marking the completion of the First Transcontinental...
Jarrod Trombley excavates sediments in the ancient ditch that marks the outer edge of the Great Circle.

A Hopewell Woodhenge

Winter 2014 A Hopewell Woodhenge By Dave Ghose Two excavators dug a long, narrow trench in the flat, vacant landscape. They were part of a small crew that worked quietly in an unremarkable patch of the...

As NAGPRA Turns Thirty | American Archaeology

Thirty years ago Congress passed landmark legislation designed to return the remains and funerary objects of countless Native Americans to the ground from which they were taken long ago. By Mike Toner This is an article...
Writer Linda Vaccariello takes notes while Assistant Professor Maureen Meyers shows U of Mississippi undergraduate Conor Foxworth and UM graduate student Emily Warner how to excavate part of the structure wall. The Mound is in the distance. Credit: Charlotte Smith

Sneak Peak: Covering the Mississippian Frontier at Carter Robinson

Fall 2017 Sneak Peek By Linda Vaccariello. The cell reception is pretty bad at Carter Robinson Mound and Village in Lee’s County, Virginia. Sometimes, if she’s lucky, Maureen Meyers can stand on the top of...
American Archaeology 2016 Spring cover

Spring 2016 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, SPRING 2016, is now available. COVER: A kiva (foreground) and the remains of an 18th-century Spanish mission church (background) are seen in this photo of Pecos National...

SPRING 2019 PREVIEW | Harvard’s History Lesson

The following is an excerpt from the Spring 2019 Issue of American Archaeology Magazine.  By Elaine K. Howley COVER IMAGE: The excavators have recovered numerous pipes. This white clay pipe with a partially broken stem dates to...
COVER: A feather bundle (upper right), a pair of tapestry-woven yucca sandals (below) and a woman’s yucca-cordage apron with human-hair waistcord are some of the artifacts researchers have reexcavated. Credit: Courtesy of the American Museum of Natural History cat. # H-13338; the Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Brigham Young University cat. #1992.30.1 and .2; the Field Museum of Natural History cat. #165246/Laurie Webster

American Archaeology Magazine Spring 2017 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, SPRING 2017, is now available! COVER: A feather bundle (upper right), a pair of tapestry-woven yucca sandals (below) and a woman’s yucca-cordage apron with human-hair waistcord are some...

Rich Man, Poor Man

Summer 2018: By Wayne Curtis. In the first half of the first millennium A.D., Teotihuacan in central Mexico was the largest city in the western hemisphere. At its peak, it had about 125,000 residents and...