Western Regional Director Cory Wilkins onsite at Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, near Las Vegas, NV.

Coming Full Circle

Introducing our Western Regional Director, Cory D. Wilkins I tend to describe myself as a desert rat. It seems that sagebrush and dust run through my veins. As a Native Nevadan, I am proud of...
Fragment of bone at Amity Pueblo

Tribes, Archaeologists Appeal Government Over Amity Pueblo Desecration

by Mark Sanders - guest author Almost a year ago to the day, the Phoenix New Times reported on large-scale site disturbances at Amity Pueblo, a long-abandoned Native American settlement located in the eastern Arizona village...
Excavations in progress, Benchmark Cave, 1958. Don Fowler taking notes, on left. Photo Courtesy the Museum of Natural History of Utah.

Using Science to Revive Old Excavations

Guest Blog by Professor Bill Lipe Professor Emeritus, Washington State University; Member of the Board of Directors, The Archaeological Conservancy The value (and excitement) of archaeological field work doesn’t end when the pits are backfilled,...
Larry L. Baker at work in 2012. Courtesy Larry L. Baker.

Stabilizing Archaeology: Engaging the Public in Architectural Preservation

By Larry L. Baker,  Salmon Ruins Museum, San Juan County Museum Association In 1974, I was hired by Dr. Cynthia Irwin-Williams for her research projects at the Salmon Ruins, near Bloomfield, New Mexico and the...
Carol Condie, holding photo board in front of a house in Elida, New Mexico, 1999. This contract project was to record all of the buildings along a 63-mile stretch of Interstate 70 in southeastern New Mexico prior to planned alterations to the highway. The construction technique was an unusual one in our experience, but seemed to be common in the area. Wooden forms were set in place as they would have been for a concrete pour, but instead of concrete, adobe mud mixed with gypsum was poured into the forms and allowed to set up. This doubtless required sequential pours.

Anthropology, New Mexico Fieldwork, & The Archaeological Conservancy

The path to my spot on the Conservancy Board began early and ran a ragged course. I was born in Provo, Utah, but since both of my parents grew up in small towns in southwestern...
Working on excavations at the Burch House site at Port Tobacco. Photo Courtesy Kelley Berliner.

Remembering The Public: Connecting Archaeology & Outreach

Introducing Our Eastern Regional Field Assistant: Kelley Berliner As a kid, historical markers, antique malls, flea markets, steam engine tractor shows, and just about anything else that had to do with old things were mandatory...
Gordon Wilson, TAC Chairman of the Board, visiting the Conservancy's 501st Saved Site with fellow board members, William 'Bill' Lipe and Carol Condie (left), and Dorinda Oliver (right). Photo: The Archaeological Conservancy.

Economics & Archaeology: My Road to The Archaeological Conservancy

I was first exposed to Native Americans and ancient cultures in grade school during the early days of black and white television, when the shows were mostly about cowboys and Indians. And, my sixth...

Civic Pride and Conservation Archaeology

Introducing Our Eastern Regional Director: Andy Stout My first memory of anything connected to archaeology was when I was a boy in the 1970’s, and while working in a community garden next to my childhood...
Regional Director Paul Gardner checking on a site.

A “Road to Damascus” Moment

Introducing  Our Midwest Regional Director, Part 2 of  the Midwest Regional Office Blog By Paul Gardner Becoming the Midwest Regional Director for The Archaeological Conservancy exemplifies John Lennon’s saying that “Life is what happens to you while you’re...
Google Project Tango smartphone

Archaeology with Google’s 3D Mapping Project Tango Phone

Archaeological research could benefit from Google's new 3D modeling device. But are archaeologists ready to explore its potential uses? I’m sure it has come to no surprise that the demand for technologically trained archaeologists has...