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American Archaeology Magazine Winter 2016 is Here!

AA winter 2016-17 Cover. Rediscovering the Alamo

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, WINTER 2016, is now available!

  • COVER: A researcher operates a ground-penetrating radar machine at the Alamo in search of buried artifacts and features.
  • Credit: Reimagine The Alamo

Articles:

REDISCOVER ING THE ALAMO BY RICHARD A. MARINI
An archaeological project is playing an important role in an effort to make this iconic site more interesting to tourists.

A SENSE OF PLACE BY MIKE TONER
A Hohokam rock art study takes the unusual approach of examining not only the images, but also their surroundings.

A NEW VIEW OF MOUNDVILLE BY ALEXANDRA WITZE
For years this Mississippian site was thought to be a political capital, but recently some researchers have arrived at a different conclusion.

FINDING LUNA BY TAMARA J. STEWART
Archaeologists have recently discovered the first permanent European colony along Florida’s Gulf Coast.

HOW WERE THE AMERICAS COLONIZED? BY DAVID MALAKOFF
Experts are struggling to develop a plausible colonization model from the latest archaeological and genetic evidence.

New Acquisitions:

EARLY LIFE IN THE AMERICAN BOTTOM
The McCarty Mound could offer a glimpse of the American Bottom’s prehistory.

MAKING MEYER POTTERY
The Meyer Pottery Kiln contains information about nineteenth- and twentieth-century ceramics production.

Get your Copy of WINTER 2016 Now! Receive a subscription to American Archaeology Magazine with a $30 annual donation. Please visit our Membership page for details on how you can become a member.

Also available at Newsstands and Bookstores near you.

Browse Articles Summaries from our last issue, FALL 2016.  Explore Back Issues. Back issues, 2 years old or older, are available online to search and download.

Learning About The Corona Phase: English-Harkey (New Mexico)

A flake (top) and a sherd found on the site. Credit: The Archaeological Conservancy.
A flake (top) and a sherd found on the site. Credit: The Archaeological Conservancy.

Site Saved with POINT-6 Emergency Preservation Funds! Donate! Each donation will be matched dollar for dollar!

The English-Harkey site lies in Lone Mountain Canyon, a few miles north of the Town of Carrizozo, New Mexico. The site, which was first recorded in 1973, is an early Jornada Mogollon settlement that dates to the little-known Corona Phase between A.D. 950 and 1000, when this region was scattered with small hamlets.  Subsequently, people began to aggregate at larger sites and focus more intensively on agriculture.

In 1986, a team led by archaeologists Jane Kelley and Joe Stewart of the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, investigated the site, which is named after landowners Fred English and Howard Harkey of Carrizozo. The researchers defined the site boundaries, created a map, and proposed auger testing and excavations of portions of the site. In order to determine the nature, depth, and preservation of cultural deposits, the archaeologists conducted forty-nine auger tests within and outside of forty-three features.  They also excavated two of these features as well as another area. The researchers’ principal objective was the recovery of faunal and botanical samples from these archaeological contexts, since such material has rarely been found intact at a Corona phase site.

Botanical analysis of the plant remains revealed charred corn, juniper seeds, pine bark fragments, and yucca seeds and pods. The faunal remains came from antelopes, rabbits, and rodents. Future research at the site will help to refine our understanding of the region’s chronology and the nature of subsistence strategies for this period during which people apparently did not practice intensive agriculture.

The site faced threats from modern development, looting, grazing, and erosion, and was listed for sale by the previous landowners. The Conservancy recently purchased the 19.5-acre lot containing the site for $15,000 with funds from the Point-6 program. The site will be fenced and a long-term management plan will be created to address site security, stabilization, and access issues with input from adjacent landowners, the State Historic Preservation Division, and knowledgeable archaeologists.

This excerpt was published in our SUMMER 2018  Issue of American Archaeology.

Browse the article excerpts in our last issue SUMMER 2018 Issue.

American Archaeology Magazine is available on newsstands and at bookstores. Subscriptions are available by becoming a Member of the Archaeological Conservancy for an annual Donation of $30 dollars.

Preserving An Ancestral Zuni Village: Amity Pueblo (New Mexico)

The pueblo is now a grass-covered rubble mound that contains about sixty rooms. Credit: Chaz Evans/The Archaeological Conservancy.
The pueblo is now a grass-covered rubble mound that contains about sixty rooms. Credit: Chaz Evans/The Archaeological Conservancy.

The upper Little Colorado River region of northeastern Arizona has a rich archaeological heritage with hundreds, if not thousands, of Ancestral Puebloan sites. This area is described by the Zuni people as an “umbilical cord” that connects Zuni Pueblo in west-central New Mexico with their place of origin in the Grand Canyon. Amity Pueblo, which was established as early as A.D. 900, is a highly significant ancestral village for the Pueblo of Zuni. It’s now a rubble mound that’s thought to contain some sixty rooms. Archaeologists previously evaluated the site as eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, and four tribes have stated that it is a traditional cultural property, meaning it holds religious significance for them.

Amity Pueblo is the Conservancy’s eighth ancestral Zuni preserve in Arizona and New Mexico. The Conservancy, in consultation with the tribes, Arizona Game and Fish, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, archaeologists, and adjacent property owners, will develop a long-term management plan for the site that will include provisions for routine monitoring and access to the land by the consulting tribes.

This excerpt was published in our SUMMER 2018  Issue of American Archaeology.

Browse the article excerpts in our last issue SUMMER 2018 Issue.

American Archaeology Magazine is available on newsstands and at bookstores. Subscriptions are available by becoming a Member of the Archaeological Conservancy for an annual Donation of $30 dollars.

A Vestige of The Late Archaic: Perthshire Mound (Mississippi)

The eight-foot-high Perthshire Mound is covered by trees. Credit: Archaeological Conservancy.
The eight-foot-high Perthshire Mound is covered by trees. Credit: Archaeological Conservancy.

The Perthshire Mound site, named for the community in Mississippi in which it’s located, was first officially recorded in 1940. Unfortunately, there are no photos of the site and no sketch map from this recording. The site description simply states that there are two mounds with a highway separating them. The mound on the west side of the highway was approximately eight-feet high, and the mound on the east side was about six. Both mounds were surrounded by cotton fields. Shortly after the site was recorded and before even a rudimentary surface collection could be done, the east-side mound was destroyed to facilitate cotton production. But the other mound has remained intact, and was owned by a member of the Knowlton family, who also owned the land back in 1940.

The Perthshire Mound site has been in the Knowlton family for many years and it was one of the plantations documented by photographer Marion Post Wolcott, a photographer for the
Farm Security Administration, in 1939 and 1940. Her photographs depict the lives of those who were tenants on the plantation and the work required to cultivate cotton in the 1930s and 1940s.

Perthshire Mound and the land around it has been home to generations of Mississippians, both prehistorically and historically, and in order to ensure its preservation, owner Sam
Knowlton recently donated the mound to the Conservancy. It now joins the nearby Blanchard Mound site, which the Conservancy also acquired.

This excerpt was published in our SUMMER 2018  Issue of American Archaeology. Browse the article excerpts in our last issue SUMMER 2018 Issue.

American Archaeology Magazine is available on newsstands and at bookstores. Subscriptions are available by becoming a Member of the Archaeological Conservancy for an annual Donation of $30 dollars.

American Archaeology Summer 2018 is Here!

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, SUMMER 2018, is now available! COVER: Kin Kletso is one of Chaco Canyon’s great houses. Evidence indicates that gambling could have played an important role in the lives of Chacoans. CREDIT: James Q. Jacobs
The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, SUMMER 2018, is now available! COVER: Kin Kletso is one of Chaco Canyon’s great houses. Evidence indicates that gambling could have played an important role in the lives of Chacoans. CREDIT: James Q. Jacobs

The most recent issue of American Archaeology Magazine, SUMMER 2018, is now available!

  • COVER: Kin Kletso is one of Chaco Canyon’s great houses. Evidence indicates that gambling could have played an important role in the lives of Chacoans.
  • CREDIT: James Q. Jacobs

Articles:

WHEN THE GAMBLER CAME TO CHACO BY ALEXANDRA WITZE
Oral histories and archaeological evidence indicate the significance of gambling at Chaco Canyon.

RETHINKING SHELL MIDDENS BY DAVID MALAKOFF
Archaeologists have come to realize that shell middens can be much more than mounds of trash.

Summer Travel: A TOUR OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA’S RICH ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY BY ANDREA COOPER
There’s much to see in this part of the Tar Heel state.

RICH MAN, POOR MAN BY WAYNE CURTIS
Archaeological evidence suggests wealth inequality has existed for millennia.

A REVOLUTIONARY TECHNOLOGY BY LINDA VACCARIELLO
LiDAR is an amazing tool, but it can also present problems.

ACQUISITIONS:

new acquisition: A VESTIGE OF THE LATE ARCHAIC
The Conservancy saves another ancient mound.

new acquisition: THE CONSERVANCY PRESERVES AN ANCESTRAL ZUNI VILLAGE
Amity Pueblo is extremely important to the Zuni.

POINT-6 acquisition: LEARNING ABOUT THE CORONA PHASE
The English-Harkey site could provide important information about this little-known phase. Join crowdfunding for POINT-6 Emergency Preservation Fund. Donate at https://give.archaeologicalconservancy.org/ . Each donation will be matched dollar for dollar! Now 138 Sites have been saved by POINT emergency funds. Learn more about the other 3 new sites saved so far with POINT-6 emergency funds: You Can Save Archaeological Sites

Get your Copy of SUMMER 2018 Now! Receive a subscription to American Archaeology Magazine with a $30 annual donation. Visit our Membership page for details on becoming a member.

Browse Articles Excerpts from our last issue, SPRING 2018

Explore Back Issues Online. Back issues, 2 years old or older, are available online to search and download. Order hard copies of Back Issues mailed to your home.

When The Gambler Came To Chaco

Gambling artifacts have been found at Chetro Ketl, a great house in Chaco Canyon. Credit: ANDREW KEARNS
Gambling artifacts have been found at Chetro Ketl, a great house in Chaco Canyon. Credit: ANDREW KEARNS

Summer 2018: By Alexandra Witze.

Navajo oral histories tell of a Great Gambler who had a profound effect on Chaco Canyon, the Ancestral Puebloan capital located in what is now northwestern New Mexico. His name was Nááhwiilbiihi (“winner of people”) or Noqóilpi (“he who wins men at play”), and he travelled to Chaco from the south. Once there, he began gambling with the locals, engaging in games such as dice and footraces. He always won.

Faced with such a formidable opponent, the people of Chaco lost all their possessions at first. Then they gambled their spouses and children and, finally, themselves, into his debt. With a group of slaves now available to do his bidding, the Gambler ordered them to construct a series of great houses—the monumental architecture that fills Chaco Canyon today.

To archaeologist Rob Weiner, the story of the Gambler reveals a previously unappreciated part of Chaco’s past. Through his betting skills the Gambler became powerful enough to coordinate the immense amounts of labor and planning needed to build Chaco’s architecture. And the archaeological record at Chaco supports the oral histories. For more than a century, researchers there have unearthed hundreds of gaming-related artifacts such as bone dice and wooden sticks.

Such games would have played a crucial role in developing and maintaining community relationships at Chaco, said Weiner, who is a research affiliate with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, as well as a research associate with the Solstice Project in Santa Fe, New Mexico. People from different family groups might have settled minor arguments with a friendly game of dice. Or neighboring communities could have brought their best goods to wager during a high-stakes sporting game, much as a bookie might take a bet on the Super Bowl today. “Gambling was taking place in Chaco, and it had a lot of social repercussions,” Weiner said.

Read More in our SUMMER 2018 Issue of American Archaeology, Vol. 22 No. 2.             Browse Content of this Issue: SUMMER 2018.

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Rethinking Shell Middens

This illustration of numerous shell mounds at the Turner River Shellworks site in Ten Thousand Islands, Florida, is based on archaeological evidence.Credit: MARTIN PATE, COURTESY MARGO SCHWADRON, NPS
This illustration of numerous shell mounds at the Turner River Shellworks site in Ten Thousand Islands, Florida, is based on archaeological evidence. Credit: MARTIN PATE, COURTESY MARGO SCHWADRON, NPS

Summer 2018: By David Malakoff

In the fall of 2005, Hurricane Wilma, a powerful storm packing 120-mile-an-hour winds, smashed into the Ten Thousand Islands, a fifty-mile-long maze of mangrove-ringed islets on the Florida’s southwestern coast. Once the storm had passed, the National Park Service dispatched one of its staff scientists, Margo Schwadron, to assess how dozens of archaeological sites on public lands in the remote region had fared.

“We didn’t know much about what was out there; for the most part, the sites were just dots on a map,” Schwadron recalled. But given a boat and some enthusiastic assistants, she began a systematic survey and was stunned by what she found. “We’d pull up to an island and see this bank of oyster shells rising eight or ten feet out of the water. Then you’d climb up and realize there was so much more” beneath the tangled vegetation: enormous sculpted mounds, ridges, ramps, plazas, basins, and canals that sometimes covered more than 100 acres. “There were entire islands, whole landscapes, that people had constructed from shell,” she said. “It was mind boggling.”

The experience prompted Schwadron to launch an ambitious, years-long study of some of the world’s largest and most complex prehistoric constructions made from shells. She and her colleagues have mapped more than a dozen major shellworks in the Ten Thousand Islands, as well as more than forty smaller shell structures. They have recovered nearly 50,000 artifacts, including ceramics and tools made from animal bones and shell. Radiocarbon dating of shell fragments and other materials indicates that people began creating the shell structures in the Ten Thousand Islands at least 3,500 years ago, during the Late Archaic period.

The findings are helping reshape how scholars perceive North America’s prehistoric hunter-gatherers, and the numerous mounds of oyster, mussel, and snail shells they often left behind.

Read More in our SUMMER 2018 Issue of American Archaeology, Vol. 21 No. 1.             Browse Content of this Issue: SUMMER 2018.

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A Tour Of Western North Carolina’s Rich Archaeology & History

Cherokee lifestyles and history are on display at Oconaluftee Indian Village. Credit: EBCI DESTINATION MARKETING
Cherokee lifestyles and history are on display at Oconaluftee Indian Village. Credit: EBCI DESTINATION MARKETING

Summer 2018: By Andrea Cooper.

We rounded a corner in the Rankin Museum of American Heritage in Ellerbe, North Carolina (population 986), when my husband burst out laughing with delight.  Behind glass cases is a wide-ranging collection of arrowheads, blades, scrapers, and other ancient tools, including some discovered on a nearby dig in the Yadkin-Pee Dee River basin, dating to 10000 B.C. The discovery reminded me that you never know what archaeological or historical treasures you may find in even modest circumstances, and that people have lived in my adopted state a long, long time.  We took a driving trip in the western half of the state, stretching more than 250 miles from the Piedmont to the Blue Ridge Mountains, to learn more about the area’s archaeology and history.

Our journey started in our hometown of Charlotte, a city with plenty of good restaurants and craft breweries, pro sports teams, and a thriving arts scene.  The rap on Charlotte is that it’s fond of marginalizing its history and demolishing historic buildings, but two fine history museums are well worth a stop. On the grounds of the Charlotte Museum of History, the Hezekiah Alexander Homesite boasts a two-story stone house built in 1774, along with a reconstructed log kitchen and springhouse. Period furniture suggests how the home might have looked when some of Alexander’s ten children played there.  The Levine Museum of the New South considers Charlotte and the South post-Civil War, with images, video clips, music, oral histories, and more than 1,000 artifacts showing the region’s dramatic changes over time.  Visitors can go inside a one-room tenant farmer’s house, or sit at a re-created lunch counter and hear stories from sit-in leaders who fought for equal rights in Greensboro, Charlotte, and Rock Hill, South Carolina, in the 1950s and ‘60s.

Read More in our SUMMER 2018 Issue of American Archaeology, Vol. 21 No. 1.             Browse Content of this Issue: SUMMER 2018.

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Rich Man, Poor Man

This elite residence at Teotihuacan was only slightly larger than the standard commoner residence found there. Credit: MICHAEL E. SMITH.

Summer 2018: By Wayne Curtis.

In the first half of the first millennium A.D., Teotihuacan in central Mexico was the largest city in the western hemisphere. At its peak, it had about 125,000 residents and was estimated to be the sixth largest city in the world. Among its features were a number of elaborate “apartment complexes” dotting the site, with clusters of three to ten households each sharing a central courtyard. “These were large, walled compounds and each one had several apartments,” said Michael Smith, an Arizona State University archaeologist and Director of the Teotihuacan Research Laboratory. “If I had excavated this apartment compound at one of the Aztec sites I’ve excavated, I’d say this is a noble’s house for sure—it’s so big and luxurious and fancy,” he said.

But it wasn’t for nobility. “That was the standard form at Teotihuacan,” said Smith. While future excavations may show a less affluent class lived more humbly nearby, currently the evidence suggests a society where the gulf between the richest and poorest was relatively narrow compared to other cultures at the time. Among those other contemporaneous cultures was the Roman Empire, which was flourishing on the other side of the Atlantic. The gulf between rich and poor was markedly larger there, perhaps most famously at Pompeii, where the evidence of how people lived was preserved following the catastrophic volcanic explosion.

Wealth distribution among modern societies has been subject to increased scrutiny in recent years. Statistics focusing on the gap between rich and poor have become a mainstay of news accounts—the richest one percent of the world’s households own a little more than half the world’s wealth. “Social inequality is one of the big issues that we’re grappling with today,” said David Carballo, an archaeologist at Boston University, whose work has focused on pre-Hispanic civilizations of central Mexico, including Teotihuacan. And while most studies have looked at trends in wealth concentration over the past two centuries, thanks to copious written records, others are examining inequality deeper in the past, examining the story as told by the archaeological record. “In archaeology we have the vantage of deep time,” said Carballo. “I think we as archaeologists should have a seat at the table, and be using our data set—which is the deep history of humankind—to understand those issues.”

Read More in our SUMMER 2018 Issue of American Archaeology, Vol. 21 No. 1.             Browse Content of this Issue: SUMMER 2018.

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A Revolutionary Technology

This LiDAR image of the center of Caracol reveals pyramids, plazas, agricultural terraces, roadways, and other features. Credit: COURTESY OF ARLEN AND DIANE CHASE, CARACOL ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROJECT, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS.
This LiDAR image of the center of Caracol reveals pyramids, plazas, agricultural terraces, roadways, and other features. Credit: COURTESY OF ARLEN AND DIANE CHASE, CARACOL ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROJECT, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS.

Summer 2018: By Linda Vaccariello.

Arlen Chase’s recent field season at Caracol, the large Maya site in western Belize that he and his wife, archaeologist Diane Zaino Chase, have been investigating for more than thirty years, was nothing less than exhausting. Among the challenges was a forty-minute uphill slog through the rainforest to the excavation site every day. “It was a really hard season,” Chase said. “Which, at my age, was pretty stupid.” But in one way Chase’s job is much easier than it was when he began exploring Caracol.  Since 2009, he has been using data from LiDAR, the technology that is revolutionizing archaeology in areas with heavy vegetation by making it possible to digitally map remote sites with incredible accuracy.

LiDAR stands for light detection and ranging. It’s a remote sensing technology that operates on the same principle that a bat uses to navigate a cave or find a mosquito to gobble. The bat sends out an ultrasonic chirp, the sound waves bounce back when they hit something solid, and the bat calculates the distance between itself and that object based on how long it takes the sound to return. Instead of sound, LiDAR uses lasers, sending out thousands of pulses of light a second and calculating the distance of objects by analyzing the time it takes for the pulses to return. If the LiDAR unit is aloft in a helicopter or an airplane and linked to a GPS, the data from the reflected light can be used to produce a map of the terrain below, surveying large areas quickly and accurately.

LiDAR emerged in the 1960s, shortly after the first lasers were invented. The early applications were in the military, atmospheric science, and the space program. By 1971, Apollo 15 used the technology to map the surface of the moon. Today, LiDAR has a wide range of uses, from monitoring the earth’s melting glaciers to preventing self-driving cars from crashing. LiDAR enables users to survey vast swaths of territory quickly and precisely. But it’s the ability of this technology to digitally sweep away the vegetation and map the land below that makes it so valuable to archaeologists.

Read More in our SUMMER 2018 Issue of American Archaeology, Vol. 21 No. 1.             Browse Content of this Issue: SUMMER 2018.

Subscribe to American Archaeology Magazine with a $30 annual donation. Visit our Membership page for details on how you can become a member.

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Saving Sites: Thank You to POINT-6 Emergency Preservation Donors & Supporters

Thank you so much to all our amazing and generous donors for their support of the POINT-6 Emergency Preservation Fund.  Thank you for putting your dollars where it counts and sharing your commitment to protecting the archaeological heritage we will hold in trust. We had the most online donors ever for a Conservancy crowdfunding campaign with 195 donors. Together we were able to raise 96% or our goal, totaling $27,869 dollars.  All of your generous donations will be matched dollar for dollar.

Thank you to Anonymous, Virginia Gaines, Anonymous, Anonymous, Kristina Dendinger, Roberta McKennna, Anonymous, Allis Gillmor, Anonymous, Bruce Kramer, Elizabeth Fader, William J. Cleary Jr., Dottie Middleton, Marla Krauss, Nancy Slater, Virginia Wulfkuhle, Edward Cassidy, Mary Schultz, Jeanette Shortley, Sheryl Fullterton, Paula Bateman, Harvey Fleet, Sarah Davis, Bob Culley, Scott Cheney, Jennifer Polnaszek, S. Terry Childs, Cheryl Deese, Kathy Stark, and Sharon & David Strachan.

Thank you to Keith Forry, Martin Mcallister, Catherine Sheppard, Donna Hodge, Anonymous, Anonymous, David Keller, Nancy Dinger, Jerry Bangham, James McAvoy, Warren Buckles, Carol Shimer, Victoria Trauscht, Kimball Banks, Katherine Peterson, Walter Foxworth, Kathleen Mavournin, Kenneth Alford, William Johnson, Nancy Bruce Baetz, Shari Silverman, Geoffrey Simard, Raven Reitstetter, Peggy Bender, Lorna Reed, William Griffin, Anonymous, Randall Turner, Bliss Bruen, and Jim & Bliss Judge.

Thank you to James Trogolo, Dave and Ann Phillips, James Bennett, Steve Prentice-Dunn, Linda Ferber, Laraine Turk, Steven Mewaldt, Anna Doyle, William Yeager, Virginia Burgess, Carolyn Beisler, Joseph Ashcraft, William Riker, Don Mochel, Deborah Prather, Jennifer Huang, Sharon Geil, Harry and Debra Whitehill, Chip Colwell, Jacquelyn Feldman, Thomas Broker, Arthur Johnson, Patric McPoland, Ashley Dumas, Bonnie Miller, Dennis Keys, Patricia Foschi, James Theler, and Lynn A Neal.

Thank you to Thomas Gillooly, Tim Maxwell, Roger Moore, William Newsom, Douglas Sporn, Barbara Karpel, Anonymously, Robert Hiller, Leah Lewin Gibbons, Ralph Bertonaschi, Aaron Hoard, Robert Thunen, Carolyn Radlo, James Zerwick, Jan Griffin, Bruce Pitner, Robert Van Horn, Richard D. Cook, Helen Goldstein, Lori Iliff, Roger Zioncheck, Sarah Cobine, Jean Fincher, Thomas R Broker, Stephen White, Stephen Pagano, and David Ricker.

Thank You to Sherill Spaar, Laurie Burgess, Hildy Feen, Kathleen Halloran, James Galloway, Raymond Doherty, Jessica Crawford, Jan Bensien, Donna Robin Lippman, Susanne Kayyali, Frank Darr, Alan Hodge, Anonymous, Eric Seale, Carol Demcak, Thom & Dottye Pierce, Brian Hembacher, Nelson Kempsky, Peter Stupey, Mark Sechrist, Don Mochel, Jeffrey Nielsen, Scott Hendershot, Donald Burkhardt, Jean Ballagh, Evan Kay, and Judy Jensen Heffron.

Thank You to Alan Strauss, Ralph Eshelman, Sidney Hubener, Sarah C Gillespie, Jeffrey Michel, Clinton and Stephanie Smullen, Arthur Haberl, Jacqueline Meek, Buchanan Meek, Ray Williamson, David Clinton, Fred Schott, Thomas Sutfin, Richard Cordell, Nancy Dinger, James and Anne Campbell, Karen Berggren, Ted Cloak, Julia Elmendorf,  Nancy Jensen, Marie Brundridge, Douglas Richardson, Jenny Day, H Rodney Scott, Jerry Sivets, Sarah Putsavage, Dennis Smith, Paul Gardner,  and Linda Winslow.

Thank You to  Jeffrey Michel, John Chamberlin, Nancy Dinger, Sidney Hubener, Joyce Clarke, James Wannamaker, Anonymous, William Green, Mark Barnes, Sharon Snyder, Nadia Hamid, Timothy Hill, Michael Stillman, William Burlingame, Anonymous, Constance Arzigian, Gregory Waselkov, Anonymous, Robert K Mark, Nancy Jensen, Steve Kover, Larry Krozel, Frank Darr, Kay Enfield, Catherine Harris and Anonymous for kick off our crowdfunding campaign!

Thank you to our friends and supporters for getting the word out on this important project “Saving the Past for The Future” : DigVentures in the UK: Why The Archaeological Conservancy Wants You To Help Protect America’s National Treasures ; Dr. Kristina Killgrove; NM Archaeological List Serve; Southwest Archaeology Newsletter; Tora Bourgeois, Editor for the Southern Sierra Archaeological Society;  Rob Whitlam, WA Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation; Kerry Lyste, Stillaguamish Tribe;  Denise Willis, Society for California Archaeology; Dr. Chip Cowell; Alan Osborne, Southwest Seminars; Maya Research Program; Professor Sarah Parcak;  Professor Brent Hoffman, Saving Mes Aynak;  Dr. William Taylor; and Bliss Bruen.

We want to thank each and everyone of them for their commitment to saving the threatened archaeological stories buried across this country!!!

Learn More about POINT-6: Crowdfunding Launches to Protect Our Irreplaceable National Treasures (POINT-6)

About The Archaeological Conservancy: The Archaeological Conservancy, established in 1980, is the only national non-profit organization dedicated to acquiring and preserving the best of our nation’s remaining archaeological sites. Based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Conservancy also operates regional offices in Mississippi, Maryland, Ohio, and California. The Conservancy continues to be rated a 4 star charity by Charity Navigator. The Conservancy has preserved over 515 sites across the nation. Learn More: What The Archaeological Conservancy Does